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QUADRICEPS IMPAIRMENT IS ASSOCIATED WITH KNEE MECHANICS DURING GAIT IN OBESE YOUNG ADULTS

Conference: South West American College of Sports Medicine Regional Meeting
Abstract: Background: Approximately 33% of the adult population in the United States is considered obese (28), which increases the risk of comorbidities such as osteoarthritis (OA) (34). The most notable feature of OA is the loss of articular cartilage within a joint, resulting in pain and physical disability (3). The association between obesity and OA is due to a combination of mechanical and metabolic factors (3). Greater weight from obesity adds stress to articular cartilage in weight-bearing joints, and contributes to cartilage breakdown (21). Previous studies have demonstrated an association between gait biomechanics and OA in older populations (15, 25), but data are lacking in young obese individuals without OA. Young obese compared to normal weight adults have lesser knee flexion excursion (KFE) (31), and greater vertical loading rates (vLR) during gait (30, 31). However, the source of aberrant gait mechanics in obese adults is unclear, and could be related to impaired shock attenuation from weakened musculature in the lower extremity. Obese young adults have deficits in quadriceps function after normalizing to fat-free mass, and walk slower compared to normal weight young adults. RTD was moderately associated with KEM at habitual gait speed, and KEM was also lesser in obese compared to normal weight adults. The lesser KEM in the obese group suggests that obese young adults walk with a quadriceps avoidance gait, which may contribute to knee OA development. Exercise interventions targeting RTD may be useful for improving walking mechanics in obese adults.
Listed In: Biomechanics, Gait, Orthopedic Research,
Tagged In: gait analysis, knee osteoarthritis, muscle strength, Obesity

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