Virtual Poster Session

Welcome to the Virtual Poster Session, a new and powerful tool for networking and information exchange. Here you can share your work, search though the poster library, and start a dialogue with others in your field. Each uploaded poster that pertains to force measurement and testing can currently be used to apply for an academic travel scholarship; please see the Scholarships page for application details and deadlines.

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Name: catelli

INTRODUCTION: Cam femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is characterized by an osseous overgrowth on the femoral head-neck junction [1], leading to pain and limited range of motion (ROM) during daily life activities [2]. Corrective surgery is highly recommended and performed in order to reduce or eliminate pain and further development of osteoarthritis (OA). However, it is still unclear whether it would lead to improved functional mobility. The purpose was to compare kinematic variables of the operated limb between FAI patients when performing a squat task pre-surgery and at around 2-year follow-up. A secondary objective consisted of express the results in a biomechanical functional score to quantify the joint kinematics of FAI patients compared to healthy control (CTRL) participants.
METHODS: Eleven male patients (7 arthroplasty: 34.6±8.1 years, 25.7±3.2 kg/m2; 4 open: 33.3±7.1 years, 24.9±1.9 kg/m2) and 21 CTRL (2F/19M, 33.4±6.7 years, 25.4±3.3 kg/m2) participants were recruited from the orthopaedic surgeon’s clinical practice. Patients were assigned to either an arthroplasty or open FAI surgery correction. The participants signed prior to their participation a consent form approved by the hospital and university ethics board. Patients agreed to undergo motion analysis prior to and 2 years after the surgery. The CTRL were selected based on similar age and BMI as the FAI group and underwent the same motion analysis protocol.
At the local hospital, CT scan was performed in all participants to confirm an alpha-angle higher than 55º and also establish their pelvic and knee bony landmarks. At the motion laboratory, the participants were outfitted with 45 reflective markers and performed a minimum of five trials of deep squat at a self-selected pace. Three-dimensional joint kinematics (200 Hz) of the lower limbs were captured using a ten-camera motion analysis system (Vicon, UK). Kinematics data were processed in Nexus 1.8.3 (Vicon, UK) using a modified Plug-In-Gait model and exported with a custom MATLAB script (Mathworks, USA) to calculate group averages and extract relevant variables. All trials were time-normalized based on a full squat cycle (descent and ascent phases) and individual averages for each participant were calculated across the trials.
Four kinematic variables were included in the analysis: pelvis, hip, knee, and ankle sagittal angles. The normalized root-mean-square deviation (nRMSD) was calculated between the FAI and the CTRL groups for both pre- and post-surgery conditions, expressed by


Name: sson2

Gait Mechanics Depend Upon Quadriceps Central Activation Ratio in an Anterior Knee Pain Cohort
Son SJ*, Kim HS†, Wiseman B‡, Seeley MK*, Hopkins JT*: *Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, †West Chester University, West Chester, PA, ‡West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV.

Context: Quadriceps deficits are often present in an anterior knee pain (AKP) population. However, common self-reported classification tools including Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Kujala Anterior Knee Pain (KAKP), Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK), Tegner Activity Level (TAL) scores, and/or other subject inclusion criteria may not be sensitive enough to identify specific movement characteristics in patients with AKP. Quadriceps central activation ratio (CAR) may help to discriminate movement characteristics in patients with AKP. Objective: To examine gait mechanics between two subdivisions of AKP patients, separated by quadriceps function (CAR < 0.95 and CAR > 0.95). AKP patients were defined by VAS, KAKP, TSK, and TAL scores. Design: Cohort. Setting: Controlled laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: 30 (M=16, F=14; 22.3±3 yrs, 175±9 cm, 72.5±14 kg) AKP patients participated: 15 Quadriceps Deficit (QD: CAR = 0.91±0.04, VAS = 3.87±1.3, KAKP = 82.9±6.6, TSK = 37.9±4.7, TAL = 6.3±1.2) and 15 Quadriceps Functional (QF: CAR = 0.97±0.01, VAS = 3.93±0.7, KAKP = 79.3±7.9, TSK = 36.9±5.2, TAL = 6.8±1.4). Interventions: Subjects performed three quadriceps maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) for 3 sec on a Biodex dynamometer (100 Hz). When MVC torque plateaued 1.5-2 sec later, a superimposed burst was transmitted to two electrodes placed on their quadriceps to measure CAR. Two successful trials were averaged for data analysis. Subjects performed five gait trials at a self-selected walking speed. Gait data were collected using high-speed video (240 Hz) and a force plate (1200 Hz). A functional analysis was used to detect mean between-group differences in gait mechanics during the entire stance phase (0-17% = loading response, 18-50% = mid-stance, 51-83% = terminal stance, and 84-100% = pre-swing). This analysis allowed us to compare variables as polynomial functions rather than discrete values. If 95% confidence intervals did not overlap zero, significant differences existed between groups (p < 0.05). Main Outcome Measures: Sagittal-plane knee joint angle (˚), internal knee joint torque (N∙m), and vertical ground reaction force (VGRF; N/kg). Results: Relative to QF patients, QD patients demonstrated (i) decreased knee flexion angle at 4-90% of stance, (ii) reduced internal knee extension torque at 14-32% of stance, and (iii) reduced VGRF at 19-37% of stance and increased VGRF at 46-70% of stance (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The present data suggest that relative to QF patients, QD patients adopt quadriceps weakness gait mechanics that have been reported in individuals with knee osteoarthritis, ACL reconstruction, and effused knee joints. These alterations may create long-term compensatory gait patterns at the knee and adjacent ankle and hip joints, which may lead to mechanical and biological changes in knee articular cartilage. Future research is needed to examine a potential relationship between these gait alterations and articular cartilage health over the long-term.


Listed In: Biomechanics, Gait
Name: mgbrowne

Even prior to walking slower, older adults walk with a diminished push-off – decreased propulsive forces (FP) accompanied by reduced ankle moment and power generation. The purpose of this study was to identify age-related differences in the joint-level modifications used to modulate FP generation during walking. We posit that there are two possibilities for older adults to enhance FP generation. First, older adults may increase ankle power generation and thereby alleviate compensatory demands at the hip. Alternatively, older adults may opt to exacerbate their distal to proximal redistribution by relying even more on the hip musculature.
10 healthy young adults and 16 healthy older adults participated in this study. Subjects walked at their preferred speed while watching a video monitor displaying their instantaneous FP while instructed to modify their FP to match target values representing normal and ±10% and ±20% of normal. For all trials, we estimated lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics.
During normal walking, older adults exerted smaller FP and ankle power than young adults. Enhancing FP via biofeedback alleviated mechanical power demands at the hip, without changes in ankle power. Further, older adults walked with increased FP without increasing their total positive joint work. Thus, given the same total requisite power generation, older adults got ‘more bang for their ankle power buck’ using biofeedback.


Name: chigh

Previous research has shown the utility of vibrotactile feedback to improve postural sway characteristics in persons with vestibular deficits. Tactile feedback given through vibration has been used more as a modality of training but immediate effects on postural control among older adults have not been investigated.
PURPOSE: To compare the immediate effects of tactile vibration on postural sway in healthy older adults in challenging stance and sensory conditions. METHODS: 10 healthy older adults (76.4 ± 6.8years), performed five standing balance conditions on a AMTI forceplate for 30s each: feet together on firm surface eyes open (C1), eyes closed (C2); feet together on foam surface eyes open (C3), eyes closed (C4), and tandem stance on firm surface eyes open (C5). Participants did 2 trials of each condition both with and without vibrotactile feedback. The feedback was given using a waist belt with sensors that were activated when participants swayed in a particular direction as detected by an Xbox Kinect camera (Sensory Kinetics system; Engineering Acoustics, Casselberry, FL). Center of pressure sway area was compared within each condition using a paired samples t-test to estimate the effect of vibration. RESULTS: See Table 1. Since only 5 subjects could complete C4 data was not included in statistical analysis. CONCLUSION: Tactile vibration did not acutely effect postural sway in challenging stance conditions in healthy older adults. Long term effects of tactile vibration on postural sway in challenging stance conditions need to be investigated.


Listed In: Physical Therapy
Name: cbutowicz

The purpose of this study was to determine differences in core stability between collegiate football players with and without non-traumatic shoulder pain. 20 collegiate football players completed tests of trunk control and muscle capacity. Control was assessed via an unstable chair placed on a force plate. Static control was assessed by center of pressure movement during seated balance using 95% confidence ellipse area (CEA; mm2) and mean velocity (MVEL; mm/s). Dynamic control was assessed during a speed and accuracy target acquisition task. Directional control (DC; mm; COP path to target) and precision control (movement around target prior to acquisition (PC; CEA mm2)) were measured. Capacity was assessed by trunk flexor (FLEX; s) and extensor endurance (EXT; s) and double-leg lowering (DLL; °). MANOVA (Eta) and t-tests (Cohen’s d) assessed group differences (p < 0.05) Core stability was not significantly different between groups. Data presented as mean ± stdev (No Pain/Pain), p-value, effect size: Static control- CEA 183 ± 129/ 131 ± 85 and MVEL 5.7 ± 3.0/6.4 ± 2.6, p = 0.38, Eta =.33; Dynamic Control- DC 49± 9/46 ± 6, p = 0.49, d =.39 and PC 143 ± 72/93± 25, p = 0.051, d = 0.93; Capacity: FLEX 77 ± 38/99 ± 32, EXT 74 ± 22/69± 28, p = 0.22, Eta= .40 and DLLT 14 ± 10/15 ± 11, p = 0.92, d =.05. Our data do not provide evidence of diminished core stability in football players with shoulder pain.


Name: dyocum

Purpose: An increased likelihood of developing obesity-related knee osteoarthritis may be associated with increased peak internal knee abduction moments. Increases in step width may act to reduce this moment. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of increased step width on knee biomechanics during stair ascent of healthy-weight and obese participants. Methods: Participants ascended stairs while walking at their preferred speed in two different step width conditions – preferred and wide. A 2 x 2 (group x condition) mixed model analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to analyze differences between groups and conditions (p<0.05). Results: Increased step width decreased the loading-response peak vertical ground reaction force (GRF), loading-response knee abduction moment, knee extension ROM, and knee abduction ROM in both groups. However, it also increased loading and push-off peak mediolateral GRF, and peak knee abduction angle in both groups. Obese participants experienced a disproportionate increase in loading and push-off peak mediolateral GRF, and peak knee abduction angle compared to healthy. Conclusion: Increased SW successfully decreased loading-response peak knee abduction moment. Implications of this finding are that increased SW may decrease likelihood of developing medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. This study shows that this gait modification affects obese and healthy-weight differently, and the influence of body mass on knee biomechanics.


Listed In: Biomechanics
Name: Patrick Carden

Analysis of lower limb biomechanics during jumping and landing tasks are often used to assess lower limb injury risk in research and applied practice within professional team sports. However, there are limited instances of these movements being incorporated into research focusing on Achilles tendinopathy development. PURPOSE: To investigate whether differences existed in lower limb motion and moments during jumping and landing between individuals who develop Achilles tendinopathy and those who remain injury free. METHODS: Male professional Rugby Union players without lower limb injury (n = 43) were compared to players who sustained Achilles tendinopathy (n = 8). Five single-leg drop vertical jumps per leg were performed at the start of their pre-season training. Motion of the lower limbs were recorded synchronously with ground reaction force. RESULTS: Players who sustained Achilles tendinopathy demonstrated significantly increased rear-foot inversion-eversion range of motion (p = 0.03), a reduction in dorsi-plantarflexion range of motion (p = 0.01) and knee flexion-extension range of motion (p = 0.03). Peak dorsiflexion velocity (p = 0.02) and peak knee flexion velocity were also reduced in those with Achilles tendinopathy (p = 0.03). No differences in hip joint kinematics were observed. Controls displayed slightly larger peak plantarflexion moments; however this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.15, g = 0.60). CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicated that players who subsequently developed Achilles tendinopathy displayed an altered single leg landing strategy when compared to players who did not sustain injury; with motion of the ankle joint and rear-foot most influenced.


Name: lschroe1

Collegiate softball has become increasingly popular since the passage of Title IX. As with any sport, injuries are a common occurrence. Interestingly, the base runner is at the highest risk of injury, and rounding the base, specifically, has resulted in approximately 187 game-day injuries. Rounding the base involves planting the right foot on a raised surface and cutting to the left, a dynamic movement often associated with noncontact ACL injuries. Frontal plane loading and unbalanced quadriceps-to-hamstring co-contraction indices (Q:H CCI) have been associated with increasing the likelihood of noncontact ACL injuries occurring. Neuromuscular abnormalities pre- and post-contact have also been suggested to increase the risk of injury. To date, no study has analyzed the effect of rounding a base on noncontact ACL injury risk factors in softball players. Nine recreationally active females completed two base conditions. The first simulated rounding a base with no base on the force platform (NB), and the second simulated rounding a base with a base on the force platform (WB). Three-dimensional motion capture, one force platform, and electromyography were utilized. Results indicated the WB condition reduced the risk of noncontact ACL injury by decreasing frontal plane loading. Movement patterns at the ankle and abnormal foot strikes may provide a better explanation for why noncontact ACL injuries occur while rounding first base. Post-contact Q:H CCI was significantly greater than pre-contact, indicating significantly greater quadriceps activity post-contact. Neuromuscular training could potentially reduce the load applied to the ACL and decrease the risk of injury.


Name: kuhmand15

Old versus young adults exhibit increased hip and decreased ankle joint mechanical output during level and incline walking. This distal-to-proximal redistribution of joint torques and powers is now a well-established age-related gait adaptation and has been termed biomechanical plasticity. The effect of physical capacity, which varies greatly in old adults, on this gait adaptation remains unclear. For example, high capacity old adults (i.e. those with fast walking speeds) might either retain a more youthful gait strategy or adopt larger magnitudes of plasticity in order to walk well. The purpose of this study was to quantify the relationships between physical capacity and biomechanical plasticity in old adults during level and incline walking. We conducted 3D gait analyses on 32 old adults (>70 yrs) as they walked over level ground and up a 10° incline at self-selected speeds. We used motion capture (Qualisys AB) and force platforms (AMTI) to collect kinematic and ground reaction force data, respectively. To measure physical capacity, we used the SF-36 Physical Component score and to define biomechanical plasticity we created ratios of hip extensor to ankle plantarflexor peak torques, angular impulses, peak positive powers, and work. We conducted correlation analyses between SF-36 PC scores and the biomechanical plasticity ratios. Positive relationships existed between SF-36 PC scores and all biomechanical plasticity ratios during level walking. Similar results were observed during incline walking, however only three of these four relationships reached statistical significance. Our results suggest that old adults of higher physical capacities exhibit larger magnitudes of biomechanical plasticity.


Listed In: Biomechanics, Gait
Name: asondall

The purpose of the study was to determine whether increasing trunk flexion (TF) and whole body inclination (WBI) angles influences peak knee, hip, and trunk kinematics and kinetics during running. Nineteen participants ran over ground at a self-selected speed under three postures: self-selected normal (SSN), TF, and WBI. Analyses revealed significant differences between conditions for peak knee, hip, and trunk flexion angles and peak knee and hip extension moments. Both TF and WBI postures are effective strategies for reducing peak knee extension moments during running with more load distributed to the hips. This may reduce PFJ stress and therefore aid in knee injury prevention and management. Individual preference of either altered running posture should be utilized in a clinical setting.


Listed In: Biomechanics