Virtual Poster Session

Welcome to the Virtual Poster Session, a new and powerful tool for networking and information exchange. Here you can share your work, search though the poster library, and start a dialogue with others in your field. Each uploaded poster that pertains to force measurement and testing can currently be used to apply for an academic travel scholarship; please see the Scholarships page for application details and deadlines.

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Name: jessef32

While the popularity of triathlon is increasing, the underlying biomechanics of the various bicycling positions and saddle types are not yet understood.

PURPOSE: To determine how bicycle rider position and saddle type (road vs. triathlon) affect the bicycle-rider interface forces (BRIFs) at a standardized power and cadence. METHODS: A stationary cycling ergometer was modified to include force transducers at the saddle, bottom bracket, and stem. Anatomical measurements were made in order to fine-tune rider fit on the ergometer. 9 subjects completed riding trials in all combinations of road position, road saddle, triathlon position, and triathlon saddle. Riding trials were 6 minutes, at a standardized power output of 2 Watts per kilogram (W/kg) and 90 Revolutions per Minute (RPM). RESULTS: Analysis was broken into three categories: Road Saddle, Road Position (RR) vs. Triathlon Saddle, Road Position (TR), Road Saddle, Triathlon Position (RT) vs. Triathlon Saddle, Triathlon Position (TT), and Road Saddle, Road Position vs. Triathlon Saddle, Triathlon Position. Surprisingly, there were no significant differences in saddle vertical forces between either body positions or saddle type. However, there were significant differences at the handlebar; 8.4% more body weight supported at the handlebar in the triathlon position compared to the road position while using a triathlon saddle. CONCLUSION: Across cycling positions, there is a significant change in saddle and stem vertical forces. However, within a cycling position, saddle type does not change the amount of vertical force seen at the saddle.


Name: tiffytiru

INTRODUCTION: Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is a common condition seen in orthopedic practice, accounting for approximately 25-40% of all knee injuries [1]. A commonly cited hypothesis as to the cause of PFP is elevated patellofemoral joint (PFJ) stress [2] secondary to abnormal PFJ structure. Previous studies have shown that persons with PFP exhibit altered patella position [3], abnormal femoral morphology [4], and decreased patella cartilage thickness [5] when compared to healthy individuals. However, the influence of the abnormal morphology on PFJ stress is unknown.
METHODS: Nineteen subjects (10 PFP and 9 pain-free controls) were recruited for this study. Each subject completed 2 phases of data collection: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment and biomechanical testing. The measurement of morphological variables (patella height (Insall-Salvati ratio or ISR), lateral trochlear inclination angle (LTI), and patella cartilage thickness). For the biomechanical testing, kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic were obtained.
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Pearson correlation coefficients revealed that only patella height (r=0.48, p=0.018) and patella cartilage thickness (r=-0.58, p=0.005) were significantly correlated with peak hydrostatic pressure (Table 1). Results of the stepwise regression analysis revealed that patella cartilage thickness was the single best predictor of peak hydrostatic pressure, followed by patella height. Together, these 2 variables explained 50% of the variance in peak PFJ stress.
The results of the current study support the premise that PFJ stress is associated with PFJ morphology. Patella height was the best predictor of PFJ stress with greater degrees of patella height being correlated with greater stress. This is logical given that a higher positioned patella articulates with the more shallow portion of the trochlear groove, thus decreasing PFJ contact area [6]. The finding that patella cartilage thickness was negatively correlated with PFJ stress is in agreement with the results of Li et al. [7], who demonstrated that a reduction of cartilage thickness causes increase cartilage stress. Furthermore, our findings revealed that 50% of the variance in PFJ stress could be explained by morphological factors.
CONCLUSIONS: Identifying the underlying factors that contribute to elevated PFJ stress is an important step in developing effective interventions for persons with PFP. Although abnormal structure may not be correctable through conservative measures, it is important to recognize abnormal structure may play a role in contributing to pain and pathology.


Name: danialkia

As a treatment for end-stage elbow joint arthritis, total elbow replacement (TER) results in joint motions similar to the intact joint; however, bearing wear, excessive deformations and/or early fracture may necessitate early revision of failed implant components.
A finite element model of a TER assembly was developed based on measurements from a Coonrad-Morrey implant (Zimmer, Inc., Warsaw, IN) using nonlinear elasto-plastic UHMWPE material properties and a frictional penalty contact formulation. The loading scenario applied to the model includes a flexion-extension motion, a joint force reaction with variable magnitude and direction and a time varying varus-valgus (VV) moment with a maximum magnitude of 13 N.m, simulating a chair-rise scenario as an extreme loading condition. Model results were compared directly with corresponding experimental data. Experimental wear tests were performed on the abovementioned implants using a VIVO (AMTI, Watertown, MA) six degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) joint motion simulator apparatus. The worn TER bushings were scanned after the test using micro computed tomography (μCT) imaging techniques, and reconstructed as 3D models.
Contact pressure distributions on the humeral and ulnar bushings correlate with the sites of damage as represented by the μCT data and gross observation of clinical retrievals. The results demonstrate UHMWPE bushing damage due to different loading protocols. Numerical results demonstrate strong agreement with experimental data based on the location of deformation and creep on bushings and exhibit promising capabilities for predicting the damage and failure mechanisms of TER implants.


Name: catelli

Dual-mobility (DM) bearing implants reduce the incidence of dislocation following total hip arthroplasty (THA) also it increases hip stability and range of motion (ROM). However, it is unclear whether the improved ROM will lead to better mechanical symmetry. Ground reaction forces (GRF) analysis would help to understand joint compensatory effects and symmetry in THA patients. The purpose was to compare GRF symmetry between the operated and non-operated limbs in THA patients, of either DM or conventional-cup (CC) implant, during standing and sitting tasks. Twenty-four patients and 10 control participants (5M/5F; 62±10 years; 26±4 kg/m2) were recruited and underwent motion analysis before and nine months after THA. Patients were randomly assigned to either a DM (8M/4F; 63±5 years; 28±3 kg/m2) or CC (9M/3F; 62±5 years; 28±5 kg/m2) cementless replacement. Participants performed five sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit trials, with a bench adjusted to their knee heights and each foot on an individual force plate, with motion capture and GRF data been collected. Control group demonstrated standing (0.4±1.6%) and sitting (1.2±1.6%) symmetry. During sit-to-stand, DM group reduced its SI from pre- (5.5±1.6%) to post-op (1.2±1.9%, p=0.09), while the CC group showed a significant improvement (from 8.7±2.1% to 1.5±1.4%, p=0.02). For stand-to-sit, DM group reduced its SI (from 3.3±2.2% to 0.5±1.7%) while the CC group again had a significant improvement (from 8.2±2.1% to 1.2±1.1%, p=0.02). Larger improvements in symmetry were noticed for both groups during trunk flexion when standing; and for CC group during trunk extension when sitting. After surgery, patients with either implant reached SI inside the margin of 1.5 standard deviation from the CTRL (p>0.05). Statistical significance on paired condition was only observed on CC group due to its high pre-op score; however, both surgical groups showed an improved symmetry after THA.


Name: bthakkar

INTRODUCTION
Running-related injuries are most often single-sided and are partially attributed to lower limb movement and loading asymmetries. For example, runners with tibial stress fractures demonstrate asymmetry in loading rate. Running is a dynamic athletic event in which runners often engage in both inclined and declined running with the goal of improving conditioning. Symmetry Angle (SA) is a commonly used, robust measure of determining symmetry. The purpose of this study was to compare peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) symmetry using the SA during uphill, level and downhill running on an instrumented treadmill.
METHODS
Eleven healthy adults volunteered to participate in this study and running at 2.7 m/s at grades of 0°, 5.74° incline and 5.74° decline were analyzed. SA was computed using the peak VGRF values from both the limbs.
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
No statistically significant differences in SA were observed between the three running conditions. (p=0.61) The unexpected uniformity in vertical GRF across uphill, level, and downhill running is consistent with the absence of changes in the peak magnitudes of the GRF observed previously. This suggests that neither moderate uphill or downhill running result in increases in peak GRF that may be considered injurious.
CONCLUSIONS
This was the first study that looked at kinetic symmetry using peak GRF in healthy recreational runners during the three running conditions. This study suggested that uphill and downhill running does not contribute to potential differences in interlimb symmetry and could be considered as a safe alternative to level running on a treadmill.


Listed In: Biomechanics, Gait
Name: gtierne

Rugby is intrinsically an impact sport which results in concussions being a frequent injury within the game. Repeated concussion is linked to early-onset dementia and depression, and the rules for limiting repeated concussion are an ongoing controversy. Therefore a greater understanding of the dynamics of head impacts in rugby and the mechanism of concussion is required. Accordingly, this study focuses on assessing the use of Model Based Image Matching (MBIM) and multi-camera view video for measuring six degree of freedom head kinematics during an impact event in rugby union. The matching is performed on video evidence using 3-D animation software Poser 4. The surroundings are built in the virtual environment based on the real dimensions of the sport field. A skeleton model is then used to fit the player’s anthropometry for each video frame thus allowing player kinematics to be measured. The results from this initial study suggest that the MBIM method can be applied to head impact cases in rugby union. The head kinematics results from this case are similar to those reported in literature. The MBIM method should be applied to a number of head impact cases to establish thresholds for concussion injuries in rugby. The data gained from the MBIM method can allow for more reliable kinematic data to be inputted into finite element analysis and rigid body simulations of concussion impacts. This can allow multi-axis force measurements to be measured within the brain and neck. This can ultimately lead to an improvement in concussion injury prevention and management.


Name: niamh.whelan

A popular method for measuring initial contact (foot-strike) during running is the force platform. It has been proposed that the foot contact events can be estimated using peak impact related accelerations of the leg using accelerometers. Various studies have been conducted to compare force platform and accelerometer methods in walking and running. The aim of this study was to develop a method for identifying peak impact accelerations in the anterior- posterior axis using the Delsys Trigno System during running and compare this with initial contact via force plates. Seven national and international sprinters completed runs across a force platform with an accelerometer fixed to their shin. The results showed the acceleration of the anterior-posterior axis approximated foot-strike within ±0.017 s of the foot-strike event detected by the force plate.


Listed In: Biomechanics, Gait
Name: mevan6

Asymmetries in discrete measures following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) during landing have been reported to be risk factors for secondary ACL injuries. Our purpose was to examine the impact of functional brace wear on kinematic and kinetic inter-limb movement symmetry during landing in ACL-R patients. 20 adolescent athletes (15.8 ± 1.2 years) (7 male, 13 female) 6 months following ACL reconstruction performed 5 trials of a stop-jump task in both a braced (B) and non-braced (NB) condition, with the first landing being analyzed. A custom fit functional knee brace (DJO, Vista, CA) was worn on the ACL reconstructed limb (AL) during the B trials. Mean curves were created for each limb (AL and unaffected limb (UL)) for the vertical (vGRF) and anterior-posterior ground reaction forces (apGRF) and frontal and sagittal knee angles and moments. Coefficients of multiple determination (CMD) between the AL and UL curves were compared between B and NB conditions with students’ t-tests (p≤0.05). No significant differences existed for movement and loading symmetry between B and NB conditions among all subjects. Secondary analysis revealed significant differences in apGRF (p=0.014), vGRF (p=0.011) and sagittal knee angles (p=0.003) in subjects with improved sagittal knee angle symmetry in the B condition. The data show that brace wear improves loading symmetry in adolescent patients that also exhibit improved sagittal knee angle symmetry while braced 6 months following ACL-R. Identifying factors that affect inter-limb movement and loading response to brace wear could assist in determining each patient’s need for a brace.


Name: kbsmale

Since OpenSim uses motion capture data as input while solving inverse kinematic (IK), it is subjected to soft tissue artifact (STA) as the commonly used surface markers do not correctly represent the underlying rigid bones. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of applying bone pin (BP) marker defined ranges of knee motion in OpenSim IK solutions. Participants completed successful jump lunges where they were asked to stand on their non-test limb and jump forward onto a force plate (AMTI OR 6-7-OP), land on their test limb and maintain balance for two seconds. Data were processed through OpenSim with generic knee joint constraints as well as constraints derived from BP kinematic data.

BP constrained results yielded a significantly more flexed, adducted and externally rotated knee. Significant differences were also observed for anterior/ posterior and distraction/ compression translations throughout the entire jump lunge while medial/lateral translations were only significant pre and 50 ms post contact. After contact, BP constraints produced a significantly greater flexor, abductor, and external rotator moment. With respect to translation forces, the BP solutions produced smaller posterior shear and greater medial shear and compressive forces at the knee joint.

Generic models available in the OpenSim repository contain knee joint ranges that are not physiologically realistic. Therefore, caution should be expressed when using the results from musculoskeletal modelling as STA and optimizations can introduce error in both the kinematics and kinetic solutions. This error is amplified during ballistic and high impact tasks such as jump landing.


Name: sunkukwon

Chronic ankle instability (CAI) patients often exhibit altered walking mechanics, due to strength and proprioceptive deficits associated with CAI. Reduced strength and proprioception function may alter walking energetic patterns, by reducing energy absorption and generation capability. It is unclear whether strength and proprioceptive training can affect walking energetics for CAI patients. PURPOSE: To examine the effect of a 6-week ankle and hip rehab program on ankle, knee, and hip joint energetic patterns during walking in CAI patients. METHODS: 15 CAI patients (23 ± 2 yrs, 178 ± 8 cm, 76 ± 9 kg, 83 ± 7% FAAM ADL, 56 ± 10% FAAM Sports, 3.6 ± 1.1 MAII, 4.7 ± 2.0 ankle sprains) performed ankle and hip strength and proprioceptive exercises (i.e., theraband, wobble board, etc.) 3 times per week, for 6 weeks (rehab group). 14 CAI patients (22 ± 2 yrs, 177 ± 9 cm, 75 ± 12 kg, 81 ± 9% FAAM ADL, 56 ± 12% FAAM Sports, 3.4 ± 1.2 MAII, 5.9 ± 3.3 sprains) performed no rehab exercises (control group). We measured ankle, knee, and hip joint power during walking for all patients before and after 6 week duration. Functional statistics (α = 0.05) were used to evaluate the influence of the rehab exercises on joint power for both groups across the entire stance phase of walking. RESULTS: The rehab intervention resulted in up to 0.07 W/kg more positive ankle power (concentric) between 19 and 26% of stance and up to 0.06 W/kg more positive knee power (concentric) between 40 and 48% of stance. No changes were detected in hip joint power during the stance phase of walking. CONCLUSION: Strength and proprioceptive training resulted in an improved gait energetic efficiency via increased ankle and knee power generation during mid-stance. As greater muscular strength can lead to an increase in power absorption and generation, the intervention focusing on strength could be beneficial in improving walking energetics in a CAI population.


Listed In: Biomechanics, Gait