Virtual Poster Session

Welcome to the Virtual Poster Session, a new and powerful tool for networking and information exchange. Here you can share your work, search though the poster library, and start a dialogue with others in your field. Each uploaded poster that pertains to force measurement and testing can currently be used to apply for an academic travel scholarship; please see the Scholarships page for application details and deadlines.

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Name: Michelle Norris

The purpose of this study was to investigate how a newly proposed method of stride time calculation, utilising data filtered at 2 Hz, compared to previous methods. Tibial accelerometry data for 6 participants completing half marathon running training were collected. One run was selected for each participant at random, from which five consecutive running strides were ascertained. Four calculation methods were employed to derive each stride time and results were compared. No significant difference was found between methods (p=1.00). The absolute difference in stride time, when comparing the proposed method to previous methods, ranged from 0.000 seconds to 0.039 seconds. Filtered data could offer a simplified technique for stride time output during running gait analysis, particularly when applied during automated data processing for large data sets.


Name: bthakkar

INTRODUCTION
Running-related injuries are most often single-sided and are partially attributed to lower limb movement and loading asymmetries. For example, runners with tibial stress fractures demonstrate asymmetry in loading rate. Running is a dynamic athletic event in which runners often engage in both inclined and declined running with the goal of improving conditioning. Symmetry Angle (SA) is a commonly used, robust measure of determining symmetry. The purpose of this study was to compare peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) symmetry using the SA during uphill, level and downhill running on an instrumented treadmill.
METHODS
Eleven healthy adults volunteered to participate in this study and running at 2.7 m/s at grades of 0°, 5.74° incline and 5.74° decline were analyzed. SA was computed using the peak VGRF values from both the limbs.
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
No statistically significant differences in SA were observed between the three running conditions. (p=0.61) The unexpected uniformity in vertical GRF across uphill, level, and downhill running is consistent with the absence of changes in the peak magnitudes of the GRF observed previously. This suggests that neither moderate uphill or downhill running result in increases in peak GRF that may be considered injurious.
CONCLUSIONS
This was the first study that looked at kinetic symmetry using peak GRF in healthy recreational runners during the three running conditions. This study suggested that uphill and downhill running does not contribute to potential differences in interlimb symmetry and could be considered as a safe alternative to level running on a treadmill.


Listed In: Biomechanics, Gait
Name: jpwaxman

Anterior tibial translation (ATT) is shown to load the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) as the knee transitions from non-weight bearing (NWB) to weight bearing (WB). Therefore, any factors able to effectively reduce ATT during initial WB would theoretically reduce ACL loading. This study evaluated the extent to which hamstring musculo-articular stiffness (KHAM) is associated with ATT as the knee transitions from NWB to WB in 10 healthy females (19.9 ± 1.5 yrs, 1.65 ± 0.06 m, 62.3 ± 6.3 kg). Linear regression revealed that KHAM predicted 48.6% of the variance in ATT (R^2 = .486, p = .025), with higher KHAM being associated with less ATT. KHAM is modifiable through training, and thus may be an important factor to consider from ACL injury prevention and rehabilitation perspectives.


Name: tiffytiru

INTRODUCTION: Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is a common condition seen in orthopedic practice, accounting for approximately 25-40% of all knee injuries [1]. A commonly cited hypothesis as to the cause of PFP is elevated patellofemoral joint (PFJ) stress [2] secondary to abnormal PFJ structure. Previous studies have shown that persons with PFP exhibit altered patella position [3], abnormal femoral morphology [4], and decreased patella cartilage thickness [5] when compared to healthy individuals. However, the influence of the abnormal morphology on PFJ stress is unknown.
METHODS: Nineteen subjects (10 PFP and 9 pain-free controls) were recruited for this study. Each subject completed 2 phases of data collection: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment and biomechanical testing. The measurement of morphological variables (patella height (Insall-Salvati ratio or ISR), lateral trochlear inclination angle (LTI), and patella cartilage thickness). For the biomechanical testing, kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic were obtained.
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Pearson correlation coefficients revealed that only patella height (r=0.48, p=0.018) and patella cartilage thickness (r=-0.58, p=0.005) were significantly correlated with peak hydrostatic pressure (Table 1). Results of the stepwise regression analysis revealed that patella cartilage thickness was the single best predictor of peak hydrostatic pressure, followed by patella height. Together, these 2 variables explained 50% of the variance in peak PFJ stress.
The results of the current study support the premise that PFJ stress is associated with PFJ morphology. Patella height was the best predictor of PFJ stress with greater degrees of patella height being correlated with greater stress. This is logical given that a higher positioned patella articulates with the more shallow portion of the trochlear groove, thus decreasing PFJ contact area [6]. The finding that patella cartilage thickness was negatively correlated with PFJ stress is in agreement with the results of Li et al. [7], who demonstrated that a reduction of cartilage thickness causes increase cartilage stress. Furthermore, our findings revealed that 50% of the variance in PFJ stress could be explained by morphological factors.
CONCLUSIONS: Identifying the underlying factors that contribute to elevated PFJ stress is an important step in developing effective interventions for persons with PFP. Although abnormal structure may not be correctable through conservative measures, it is important to recognize abnormal structure may play a role in contributing to pain and pathology.


Name: fmaguire

The established pathway of cognitive decline identifies Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) as a common pre-dementia syndrome. As MCI can represent the endpoint of cognitive decline or a transient state, more predictive diagnostic tools are required. A new pre-dementia syndrome, Motoric Cognitive Risk (MCR) syndrome, has been proposed. It is defined by slow gait and cognitive complaints but absence of dementia and mobility disability. MCR aims to improve on the predictive power of MCI, this study aims to explore it’s claim.

Associations have been uncovered between differing cognitive domains and specific characteristics of gait. Leveraging the gait-cognitive function relationship is a novel approach to potentially highlighting those experiencing cognitive decline. However, the diagnostic tool of MCR is a new construct and currently imperfect, its efficacy not fully validated and sensitivity for dementia prediction relatively unknown. Reliable data on prevalence and risk factors help contribute to this validation process.

In this presentation prevalence data for a multi-country aging study and a nationally representative community dwelling aging study will be presented. The variables available in both datasets which will be of interest in this study include; Gait Speed, Global Cognition (Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) score), Presence of Cognitive Complaints, Age, Body Mass Index (BMI), Dementia diagnosis (reported or imputed) and Waist Circumference. This study will inform the following research project, which will aim to assess whether specific gait components or combinations alone are better than the MCR construct in their association to cognitive decline.


Listed In: Gait, Neuroscience
Name: mcdonaac

The shoulder complex affords multiple opportunities for kinematic and muscular variability during repetitive work, which could change physical exposure and risk at work. The purpose of this study was to examine kinematic and muscular adaptations during continued performance of submaximal, repetitive work following a fatiguing protocol.

Participants (n=12) completed a sequence of three protocols: (1) 20 pre-fatigue work cycles, (2) anterior deltoid fatigue protocol, (3) 60 post-fatigue work cycles. Each work cycle was 60 seconds and consisted of 4 tasks. Reaction forces and moments were recorded with a 6DOF force sensor (MC3-500, AMTI, Watertown, MA, USA) during the work tasks. The fatigue protocol consisted of static and dynamic efforts targeting the anterior deltoid. Fatigue was quantified through changes in strength, RPE and EMG frequency and amplitude. Activity of 14 muscles of the upper extremity and torso were measured with surface electrodes and kinematics were tracked with a passive motion capture system, 30 reflective markers and a scapular tracker.
Immediately following the fatigue protocol, there were significant signs of muscle fatigue and reduced physical capacity. These changes were accompanied by significant muscular and kinematic adaptations in the work tasks during the post-fatigue work cycles (p<.05). Although these adaptations allowed for recovery in some muscles, fatigue persisted and developed in other muscles by the end of the post-fatigue work cycles, despite subjective ratings of perceived exertions returning to pre-fatigue levels. If people are unable to perceive negative behavioral changes during repetitive work, they may be at greater risk of developing workplace injuries.


Listed In: Biomechanics
Name: sson2

Chronic ankle instability (CAI) patients show various sensorimotor deficits, which may be related to the chronic nature of instability. Ultimately, an intervention should focus on deficits which may perpetuate the problem, but an understanding of successful sensorimotor function may best come from those who sprained their ankles with no problematics outcome (copers). PURPOSE: To examine sagittal ankle angles, moments, tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius EMG activation during a single-leg maximal vertical side-cutting jump task. METHODS: 66 subjects (M=42, F=24; 22.2±2 yrs, 173.8±8 cm, 71.4±11 kg) consisted of 22 CAI (77.1±15.3% FAAM ADL, 62.5±20.4% FAAM Sports, 4.1±2.8 sprains), 22 Copers (100% FAAM ADL & Sports, 2.0±1.1 sprains), and 22 healthy controls. Subjects performed 10 jumps, consisting of a max vertical jump, landing on a force plate, and transitioning immediately to a side-cutting jump, while the dependent variables were collected during stance. Functional linear models (α=.05) were used to detect mean difference between groups. If functions and associated 95% confidence intervals did not cross the zero, then significant differences existed. RESULTS: Figure 1 shows that copers and AI exhibited up to 2.5° less dorsiflexion angle during 30-75% of stance, relative to controls. While copers exhibited similar neuromechanics to controls in sagittal ankle moment, tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius EMG activation, those with CAI demonstrated up to 0.5 Nm/kg less plantarflexion moment, 2.5% less tibialis anterior and 47% less medial gastrocnemius EMG activation. CONCLUSION: Copers show neuromechanics similar to healthy controls at times, and similar to those with CAI at others. Reduced plantarflexion moment and medial gastrocnemius EMG activation suggest that those with CAI may rely more on static stabilizers (e.g., bones) than dynamic stabilizers (e.g., muscles), which could increase impact loads on tibiotalar cartilage surface.


Name: emesserschmidt

Title:  Head Acceleration During Girls Youth Soccer Using Real Time Data
 
Emily Messerschmidt, Katlyn Van Patten, Ryan Lee, Srikant Vallabhajosula

Purpose/Hypothesis: While the acute effects of concussion have been the focus of research in the past, there is a new emphasis toward following the cumulative effects of sub-concussive head accelerations in athletics. This is especially important in youth athletes because the developing brain is more vulnerable to injury from head trauma in sports like soccer due to techniques such as heading, that can result in numerous head impacts throughout play. There is a current lack of evidence on the magnitude and frequency of head accelerations that occur during real-time youth sports, including soccer, and whether these accelerations have a detrimental cumulative effect. The purpose of the current study was to measure the head acceleration that youth athletes experience during real-time soccer games.
 
Number of Subjects: 31 under-15 girls club soccer participants. 11 players monitored each game.
 
Materials/Methods: 3 season games were observed. Triax Smart Impact Monitor headband accelerometers were worn during gameplay to collect real-time head impact data. Forces >10g were recorded. Games were video recorded for further analysis. Head impacts were categorized by type of impact: purposeful header (PH), player to player (PP), player to ground (PG), and ball to head (BH). Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics.
 
Results: A total of 171 impacts were observed (PH=20, PP=113, PG=36, BH=2). Only one impact recorded was above the concussion threshold of 70g. The majority (77%) of impacts observed were <10g. Of the accelerations recorded, PH resulted in the largest average acceleration (36.8±14.9g) followed by PG (20.5±4.2g), and PP (19.5±4.6g). The maximum accelerations for PH, PG and PP were 73g, 26g and 30g respectively. No BH accelerations were recorded >10g.
 
Conclusions: While PH yielded the highest average acceleration, it was one of the least frequently occurring impacts. PP impacts were most common however the majority produced little to no head acceleration. While there was variability of head acceleration that occurred within each type of impact, none produced consistently dangerous (≥70g) accelerations.

Clinical Relevance: This study provides preliminary evidence of the impacts sustained during girls youth soccer games for athletic trainers or sports physical therapists who are monitoring athletes for concussions. The findings reveal that the use of headband accelerometers to measure real-time data can be a useful tool to monitor multiple players on the field. There remains a need for further research into the effect of cumulative sub-concussive impacts during soccer in youth athletes with larger sample size. Further studies should investigate the impacts players sustain over multiple seasons to observe if those who experience multiple sub-concussive impacts report concussion-like symptoms or show concussion-like signs. Additionally, this study adds evidence to the existing literature that the use of video analysis to confirm the occurrence of impacts and to correctly categorize them is highly beneficial to ensure reliability in future studies.


Name: niamh.whelan

A popular method for measuring initial contact (foot-strike) during running is the force platform. It has been proposed that the foot contact events can be estimated using peak impact related accelerations of the leg using accelerometers. Various studies have been conducted to compare force platform and accelerometer methods in walking and running. The aim of this study was to develop a method for identifying peak impact accelerations in the anterior- posterior axis using the Delsys Trigno System during running and compare this with initial contact via force plates. Seven national and international sprinters completed runs across a force platform with an accelerometer fixed to their shin. The results showed the acceleration of the anterior-posterior axis approximated foot-strike within ±0.017 s of the foot-strike event detected by the force plate.


Listed In: Biomechanics, Gait
Name: catelli

Dual-mobility (DM) bearing implants reduce the incidence of dislocation following total hip arthroplasty (THA) also it increases hip stability and range of motion (ROM). However, it is unclear whether the improved ROM will lead to better mechanical symmetry. Ground reaction forces (GRF) analysis would help to understand joint compensatory effects and symmetry in THA patients. The purpose was to compare GRF symmetry between the operated and non-operated limbs in THA patients, of either DM or conventional-cup (CC) implant, during standing and sitting tasks. Twenty-four patients and 10 control participants (5M/5F; 62±10 years; 26±4 kg/m2) were recruited and underwent motion analysis before and nine months after THA. Patients were randomly assigned to either a DM (8M/4F; 63±5 years; 28±3 kg/m2) or CC (9M/3F; 62±5 years; 28±5 kg/m2) cementless replacement. Participants performed five sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit trials, with a bench adjusted to their knee heights and each foot on an individual force plate, with motion capture and GRF data been collected. Control group demonstrated standing (0.4±1.6%) and sitting (1.2±1.6%) symmetry. During sit-to-stand, DM group reduced its SI from pre- (5.5±1.6%) to post-op (1.2±1.9%, p=0.09), while the CC group showed a significant improvement (from 8.7±2.1% to 1.5±1.4%, p=0.02). For stand-to-sit, DM group reduced its SI (from 3.3±2.2% to 0.5±1.7%) while the CC group again had a significant improvement (from 8.2±2.1% to 1.2±1.1%, p=0.02). Larger improvements in symmetry were noticed for both groups during trunk flexion when standing; and for CC group during trunk extension when sitting. After surgery, patients with either implant reached SI inside the margin of 1.5 standard deviation from the CTRL (p>0.05). Statistical significance on paired condition was only observed on CC group due to its high pre-op score; however, both surgical groups showed an improved symmetry after THA.