Virtual Poster Session

Welcome to the Virtual Poster Session, a new and powerful tool for networking and information exchange. Here you can share your work, search though the poster library, and start a dialogue with others in your field. Each uploaded poster that pertains to force measurement and testing can currently be used to apply for an academic travel scholarship; please see the Scholarships page for application details and deadlines.

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Name: priya28dharshini

Gait is influenced by peripheral circulation and neuro musculoskeletal system which can be affected by diabetes. Gait variations play an important role in increasing the peak plantar pressure in persons with diabetes. Biomechanical alterations in diabetic neuropathy could facilitate foot injuries, thus contributing to foot ulceration [1]. Understanding the gait characteristics in different category of diabetic population during walking can reveal the biomechanical factors which may collectively lead to foot pathology.
3-Dimensional (3D) Gait analysis was performed on 28 subjects with similar age, height, weight and Body Mass Index (BMI) (p > 0.05) with diabetes and without neuropathy (D), persons with diabetic neuropathy (DN) and persons who had a history of foot ulcer (DHU). Spatial and Temporal gait parameters along with kinematics and kinetics were compared between the three groups.
The lower extremity gait data shows that DHU subjects show increased hip flexion throughout the gait cycle with delay in peak extension and DN subjects showing a slight delay in achieving peak hip extension. DHU show a significant deviation in hip, knee and ankle mechanics when compared to other two groups. There is a slight increase in dorsiflexion among diabetic subjects during the mid - stance phase. The ground reaction force (GRF) graphs shows that the breaking force and propelling force is less in magnitude for all the three groups when compared to normal. The vertical GRF data reveals there is no significant difference among the three groups but the graph shows delayed heel rocker during the gait.
The compensation gait observed in DHU group may be due to the muscle weakness acquired in the past when there was active foot ulcer. This altered compensatory gait observed in DHU participants need to be addressed using proper corrective footwear and gait training sessions for preventing recurrence of ulcer.
References
[1] Katoulis EC, Ebdon-Parry M, Lanshammar H, Vileikyte L, Kulkarni J, Boulton AJM. Gait Abnormalities in Diabetic Neuropathy. Diabetes Care. 1997 Dec; 20(12): 1904-1907.
Acknowledgements
1. M. V. Hospital for Diabetes, Royapuram, Chennai
2. CSIR – Central Leather Research Institute and Department of Science and Technology, India


Listed In: Gait
Name: lschroe1

Noncontact ACL injuries occur during movements that involve sudden decelerations and changes in direction due to combined sagittal and frontal plane knee loading. Previous studies have shown altered knee mechanics when decision-making is involved, which may better simulate game-like scenarios in a lab setting. The purpose of this study was to determine how two unanticipated stimuli alter knee biomechanics during a dynamic task. Eight females and eight males, all recreationally-active, participated. Participants completed two unanticipated 45-degree cutting conditions (visual stimulus (VS); human defensive opponent (DO)). For the VS condition, a custom computer program presented one of three visual stimuli in a random order. For the DO condition, a research assistant attempted to “block” the participant’s running path with a defensive move, using the same three random-order tasks as in VS. For both conditions, participants had a reaction time range of 400-500 milliseconds. Separate 2×2 mixed-model repeated measures ANOVAs (condition×sex) were performed, with an alpha level of .05. Results showed a significant condition main effect for knee extension moments, which were greater in DO compared to VS (p=.009). Significant interactions were present for peak knee flexion angles and peak knee adduction moments. Females had greater flexion angles (p=.001) and adduction moments (p=.030) in VS compared to DO. Women had less knee flexion and more adduction moment in VS, possibly suggesting this stimulus amplifies ACL injury risk factors in females. A human defender increased sagittal plane loading in a manner that may better represent loading in game situations.


Name: dyeradam

Background and Aim: Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM) in midlife represents a potent risk factor for the development of dementia in later life. Early indicators to highlight particular individuals with T2DM who are at risk of cognitive decline are lacking. Subtle abnormalities in gait (and particularly dual-task gait with a cognitive task) have emerged as a potential predictor of cognitive decline in older adults, but have not been investigated in patients with T2DM. The ENBIND Study (Exploring Novel Biomarkers of Brain health IN Diabetes) aims to assess patients with T2DM in midlife without cognitive impairment and follow participants over the course of several years to establish early predictors of cognitive decline in this poorly characterised yet high-risk group.

Methods: Patients with midlife T2DM (40-65 yrs) were recruited at the time of their diabetic clinic appointment. Patients were excluded if they had a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, musculoskeletal disease, previous stroke, any form of diagnosed cognitive impairment or diabetic retinopathy/nephropathy. Patients underwent medical/diabetes assessment and examination by a physician. Cognition was screened using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and assessed using a computerised cognitive battery designed for prodromal Alzheimer's Disease (CANTAB®). Gait was then assessed using both a raw clinical measure (stopwatch) and Shimmer® Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs) across four tasks: (i) 30 metre walk at a normal pace (turn at 15m), (ii) 30 metre fast walk (turn at 15m) (iii) dual cognitive-gait task (reciting alternate letters of the alphabet) and (iv) a long walk at a self-selected pace. Between group differences were assessed using t-tests and appropriate non-parametric equivalents

Results: 20 participants with T2DM (52.05 yrs ± 2.13) and 10 matched healthy volunteers (mean age 52.2 yrs ± 2.74) were recruited. T2DM was associated with a significantly lower score on the MoCA (29.2 vs 27.6; p=0.0452). Participants with T2DM had slower but non-significant self-selected (0.87 ms-1 vs 0.8ms-1) and fast gait speed (0.66 ms-1 vs 0.59 ms-1). On the dual-cognitive task, participants with T2DM made more errors (1.1 vs 0.6), and had higher dual-task cost (9.17% vs 2.7%, p=0.014). Dual-task cost (the percentage decrement in walking speed due to introduction of the cognitive task) was significantly correlated with total MoCA score (R2 = 0.17, p =0.031).

Discussion: Otherwise healthy participants with midlife T2DM display significantly poorer scores on MoCA. Performance on the dual-cognitive gait task was significantly correlated with MoCA score. Our study adds evidence to the presence of cognitive decrements in midlife T2DM, in-keeping with its role as a potent risk factor for the later development of dementia. We provide early data to support the utility of simple clinical gait analysis, particularly where a dual-cognitive paradigm is employed. Expansion of the sample size of patients in this study as well as longitudinal follow up should afford more detailed insight into using gait as a potential marker for cognition in this high risk cohort


Name: speel

Females commonly use a landing technique that creates higher impact forces when contacting the ground, thus leading to higher ground reaction force (GRF) acting upon the lower extremities, leading to an increased risk of injury. The lower extremity musculature plays a critical role in absorbing the energy of these impact forces during landing. Understanding how specific muscle groups contribute to ground reaction force may offer insight to creating more advanced landing retraining protocols. The purpose of this study was to observe how lower extremity muscle groups contribute to GRFs during an unanticipated stop-jump task. 3D musculoskeletal simulations of unanticipated stop-jump tasks were completed for five healthy females. Participant-specific scaled musculoskeletal models (modified gait2392) were generated. A pseudo-inverse induced-acceleration analysis was used to determine individual muscle group contribution to 3D GRFs. Means ± standard deviations were calculated for each muscle group during the landing phase. The vasti, soleus, and the gluteus maximus muscle groups were most responsible for bodyweight support, with the vasti and the soleus being the largest contributors (375.84±88.64 N; 267.39±103.70 N, respectively). The vasti group (165.63±74.94 N) were primarily responsible for braking and propulsion. Finally, the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and vasti group were the major generators in producing a medially-directed GRF, with the vasti group as the largest contributor (118.05±32.83 N). The vasti, soleus, and gluteus maximus appears to be the overall largest contributors to 3D GRFs. Landing retraining protocols may want to consider targeting these muscle groups specifically to improve landing performance and decrease injury risk.