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Anticipation alters lower-limb biomechanics during drop-jump landings

Conference: 8th World Congress of Biomechanics
Abstract: ACL injury mechanisms are commonly determined from evidence gathered during highly controlled lab-based activities. However, many non-contact ACL ruptures occur following a reaction to an external stimulus, when athletes are unable to pre-plan their movement strategy1. The purpose of this study was to determine if unanticipated drop-jump landing altered lower-limb biomechanics. Ten participants performed two counter-balanced single-leg drop-jump landing conditions (anticipated and unanticipated). Unanticipated landings were conducted by randomly displaying either a left or right arrow immediately following jump takeoff. The visual cue was triggered by the participant making contact with a force platform, set at a threshold of 10N. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data for the ankle, knee and hip were time-normalized over the jumping and landing phase and with-in participant averaged over the successful trials. Paired sample t-tests, using Statistical Parametric Mapping, evaluated between condition differences over the jumping and landing phases (α = 0.05). Participants landed with significantly greater hip abduction (p=0.004) during the unanticipated condition over the entire landing phase (0-100%). Participants also landed with significantly less hip external rotation (p=0.048) over the final 17% of the landing phase. Although no differences were identified at the knee joint, participants landed with greater hip abduction and less external rotation when the movement was unaticipated. Given that proximal factors play a contributing role towards controling knee mechanics, the altered hip position could be a compensatory strategy to limit knee abduction and reduce ACL injury risk during unanticipated tasks2. 1. Olsen et al. AJSM 2004;32(4):1002-1012 2. Powers JOSPT 2010;40(2):42-51
Listed In: Biomechanics,
Tagged In: ACL Injury, Drop-Jumps, Landings, Unanticipated

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