Virtual Poster Session

Welcome to the Virtual Poster Session, a new and powerful tool for networking and information exchange. Here you can share your work, search though the poster library, and start a dialogue with others in your field. Each uploaded poster that pertains to force measurement and testing can currently be used to apply for an academic travel scholarship; please see the Scholarships page for application details and deadlines.

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Name: ekowa053@uottawa.ca

Biomechanical studies have tried to assess the impact of the surgical approach on gait characteristics and recovery after total hip arthroplasty (THA). Some studies which used discrete analyses have shown that some surgical approaches provide better hip joint function after one year post-surgery, but several studies did not find any differences. The goal of this study was to compare hip biomechanics during gait using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) in patients who underwent THA with either a lateral (LAT), anterior (ANT), or posterior (POS) approach. Forty-five patients underwent unilateral THA with either a LAT, ANT, or approach, and were compared with 15 healthy controls (CTRL). All patients underwent biomechanical gait analysis approximately 9 months following surgery. Hip biomechanics were compared between groups throughout the entire gait cycle using a One-Way ANOVA SPM. Alpha was set to 0.05 and Bonferroni post hoc comparisons were completed. The POS group had a significantly lower hip flexion moment just prior to toe-off compared to the ANT and CTRL groups. The ANT group had significantly lower hip abduction moment for most of the stance phase compared to the LAT and CTRL groups. The POS group had a significantly lower hip abduction moment compared to the LAT and CTRL groups. These findings tend to contradict existing literature. Future studies should complete both pre- and post-operative assessments with a larger cohort in each group, as well as standardize the implants as much as possible to determine if observed differences are due to the approach and no other factors.


Name: ffallahtafti

The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of induced stress on the performance of each task during high cognitive load situations(HCLS). We hypothesized that induced stress leads to performance decrements during HCLS.
In this study, the HCLS included standing while completing a secondary task(wire maze). The wire maze was composed of a metal wire path(maze) and a single ring, held in one hand that was moved over the maze without contacting the maze itself. Stress was induced through a loud buzzer when the ring contacted the maze. Participants were asked to randomly stand 1)quietly, or while completing the wire maze 2)with or 3)without the buzzer. Trials were three-minute long.
A sample of 18 healthy young participants, (24.76±3.56 years) were randomly recruited.
Perceived stress was obtained after each trial. Regularity of ground-reaction-force (GRF) in anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions as well as wire maze error (ring-to-path contact) were calculated as primary and secondary task performance.
GRF was more irregular during quietly standing compared to HCLS with and without the buzzer in both the AP and ML directions(p=0.02, p=0.001, respectively in anterior-posterior,η^2=0.28)&(p=0.004, p<0.0001, respectively in medial-lateral, η^2=0.39). Perceived stress was significantly lower during quietly standing compared to HCLS with(p=0.001, η^2=0.45) and without buzzer(p=0.007) conditions. Overall, the hypothesis was supported partially; during the most stressful HCLS, the high level of perceived stress coincided with less wire maze errors(P<0.0001, d= 0.72).
Identifying the strategies underlying task prioritization can help clinicians design appropriate interventions to challenge patients appropriately to improve performance during HCLS.