unanticipated stimuli

Does Type of Unanticipated Stimulus Alter Knee Mechanics During Dynamic Tasks?

Noncontact ACL injuries occur during movements that involve sudden decelerations and changes in direction due to combined sagittal and frontal plane knee loading. Previous studies have shown altered knee mechanics when decision-making is involved, which may better simulate game-like scenarios in a lab setting. The purpose of this study was to determine how two unanticipated stimuli alter knee biomechanics during a dynamic task. Eight females and eight males, all recreationally-active, participated. Participants completed two unanticipated 45-degree cutting conditions (visual stimulus (VS); human defensive opponent (DO)). For the VS condition, a custom computer program presented one of three visual stimuli in a random order. For the DO condition, a research assistant attempted to “block” the participant’s running path with a defensive move, using the same three random-order tasks as in VS. For both conditions, participants had a reaction time range of 400-500 milliseconds. Separate 2×2 mixed-model repeated measures ANOVAs (condition×sex) were performed, with an alpha level of .05. Results showed a significant condition main effect for knee extension moments, which were greater in DO compared to VS (p=.009). Significant interactions were present for peak knee flexion angles and peak knee adduction moments. Females had greater flexion angles (p=.001) and adduction moments (p=.030) in VS compared to DO. Women had less knee flexion and more adduction moment in VS, possibly suggesting this stimulus amplifies ACL injury risk factors in females. A human defender increased sagittal plane loading in a manner that may better represent loading in game situations.
Listed In: Biomechanics, Sports Science