postural sway

Synchronization of EEG Activity with Body Balance During Cognitive Visual Exercises

When evaluation cognition, there is a certain complexity surrounding electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings, which would greatly benefit from being supplemented by secondary recordings, such as those from a force platform. Currently, there is also a lack of evidence supporting the need to implement creative exercise on analytical coursework, specifically in STEM degrees where there is gaining momentum to incorporate the arts [3]. This pilot study aims to correlate electroencephalography (EEG, Brain Vision) and postural sway (AMTI AccuSway) data to verify cognitive changes. This study hypothesizes that participants will have 1) increased EEG alpha activity and 2) increased postural sway when participating in iterations of a problem-solving tasks administered after the participant engages in creative activities. The study will use human-subject data gathered from electroencephalography (Brain Vision) and postural sway (AMTI AccuSway) to quantify the cognitive engagement of participants during the learning of new concepts in a unique manner that allows the participants to think about them visually. The hypothesis is that the teaching methods introduced will encourage participants to have increased cognitive attention. Two participants were evaluated on their postural sway and EEG activity during the answering of Raven’s Progressive Matrices tests before and after artistic viewing and drawing activities. The data generated by this study by these means will show that increased cognition is apparent when concepts are presented in a visual manner, fortifying a philosophy that engineering curricula would benefit from artistic additions.
Listed In: Neuroscience, Posturography


The effect of a specific fatigue protocol in force propulsion and postural sway in female handball athletes

Fatigue is a case of interaction between different factors and is characterized by the increase in the perceived effort to exercise and produce force. However, the effect on balancing tasks are not completely understood, especially the time course of the postural sway parameters during the recovery phase. Twenty female handball athletes participated in this study. They stood upright in a one-leg posture supported by the non-dominant limb on a force plate. The center of pressure (COP) and the maximum propulsion force (FMAX) were obtained at baseline, immediately after the exhaustion due to the fatigue protocol and every minute during the first 10 min of the recovery phase. For the postural-sway measures, participants stood on the force plate for 30 s with eyes opened looking to a target. Based on the COP displacement, the ellipse area containing 95% of the COP data points (Area) was computed. The FMAX was measured during a countermovement jump. Specific handball actions composed the fatigue protocol in the format of a circuit with the gradual increment of laps. The force decreased ~9.5% after the fatigue protocol (p = 0.01) and returned to baseline values during the recovery phase at the fifth minute. For the postural sway, the Area decreased during the recovery phase until the fourth minute (p = 0.007). The fatigue protocol affected postural sway and force variables, which returned to baseline values after four minutes of the protocol. Therefore, we suggest that future fatigue analyses should be tested during this time window.
Listed In: Biomechanics, Posturography, Sports Science