gender

Hinged ankle braces do not alter knee mechanics during sidestep cutting

Lateral ankle sprains, caused by rapid ankle inversion, and noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) knee injuries, caused by excessive knee loading, are among the most common lower extremity injuries that occur during dynamic tasks, such as cutting. Ankle braces are commonly used to prevent lateral ankle sprains by reducing ankle inversion. There is limited and conflicting research about how an ankle brace affects other joints, such as the knee, during cutting movements. It is also not known if sex differences exist during a cutting task when an ankle brace is present. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an Ultra Zoom® hinged ankle brace and sex on ankle and knee biomechancis during a cutting maneuver. Eighteen recreationally active adults completed sidestep cutting trials with and without an Ultra Zoom® ankle brace. Three-dimensional ankle and knee kinematics and GRF were collected. Separate 2×2 (sex × brace) repeated measures ANOVAs were used. Results indicated the brace reduced frontal plane ankle kinematics and had no effect on knee kinematics. Additionally, females demonstrated decreased knee flexion compared to males. An ankle brace during a cutting maneuver restricted frontal plane ankle movement. Furthermore, the only significant changes in knee mechanics were due to sex differences, which has been well documented. These findings indicate that the use of an Ultra Zoom® hinge brace is suitable for sports, reduces the risk of lateral ankle injuries, and does not alter knee mechanics, and therefore may not increase the risk of ACL injury.
Listed In: Biomechanics, Sports Science


The Effects of Knee Taping Techniques on Lower Extremity Kinematics During Running

Introduction: Running is a popular form of physical activity linked to various lower extremity injuries. A commonly used technique for injury prevention and rehabilitation is taping. There is considerable research investigating running biomechanics, however, there has been limited to no research examining the effects of gender, speed, and the type of tape used on two-dimensional lower extremity kinematics. Therefore, the purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of gender, speed, and tape on two-dimensional lower extremity kinematics and stride characteristics during running. Method: Eight healthy runners participated (4 males, 4 females). Taping interventions (Leukotape, Kinesio Tape, no tape) and speeds (2.35 m/s, 3.35 m/s) were randomized and lower extremity stride kinematics were obtained using the Peak Motus System at initial contact, midstance, and toe off of running. Comparisons were made using descriptive statistics. Results: Females exhibited greater hip (FIC= 164.04+1.99°; MIC= 167.54+2.12°) and knee flexion (FIC= 167.73+0.93°; MIC= 170.42+1.65°; FPK= 142.83+1.28°; MPK= 146.35+1.21°), while males had greater ankle dorsiflexion (FIC= 88.60+1.00°; MIC= 84.14+1.08°) and plantarflexion (FTO= 51.90+1.01°; MTO= 55.99+0.825°). Females spent more time in support (FCT= 0.28+0.03s; MCT= 0.26+0.02s) while males spent more time in the air (FFT= 0.45+0.02s; MFT= 0.48+0.01s). Faster speed was associated with greater hip flexion and extension (SIC= 167.57+1.95°; FIC= 164.01+2.11°; STO= 197.14+1.23°; FTO= 201.28+0.74°), peak knee flexion (SPK= 145.39+1.82°; FPK= 143.79+2.39°), and less time during contact (SIC = 0.30+0.01s; FIC= 0.25+0.00s). Conclusion: Gender and speed seem to have effects on lower extremity stride kinematics, whereas type of tape does not.
Listed In: Biomechanics, Gait, Other