elderly; Tai Chi; gait; walking; moments; joint force; kinematics; temporospatial; kinetics

Kinetics and kinematics of the lower extremity during performance of two typical Tai Chi movements by the elders

Tai Chi (TC) has the rehabilitative potential to prevent falls in the elderly, however it is unclear how TC training improves postural control capacity. Fifteen male participants with more than 4 years of TC experience were asked to perform two TC movements, the “Repulse Monkey (RM)” and “Wave-hands in clouds (WHIC).” Three-dimensional (3-D) temporospatial, kinematic and kinetic data was collected using VICON motion analysis system with 10 infrared cameras and 4 force plates. Stride width, step length, step width, single- and double-support times, center of mass (COM) displacement, peak joint angles, range of motion, peak joint moments, time to peak moment, and ground reaction force (GRF) were analyzed. The differences in the measurements of the two TC movements were compared with walking using two-way ANOVA analysis. Compared with walking kinematics, both TC movements spent less time in single-support; RM and WHIC had larger mediolateral and vertical displacement of the COM. Compared with walking kinetics, both TC movements generated significantly smaller peak ground reaction forces in all directions, except the anterior; larger hip extension, adduction and internal rotational moments, knee adduction/abduction and internal rotation moments and eversion/inversion and external/internal moments of ankle–foot; and longer peak moment generation time for hip extension, adduction and internal rotation, knee extension and ankle dorsiflexion and inversion. The slow, gentle stepping-action and loading patterns that are consistent with the mechanical behavior of biological tissues. These two TC movements would be suitable training to help strengthen the lower extremities and prevent falls in the elderly.
Listed In: Biomechanics, Gait, Sports Science