EEG

Synchronization of EEG Activity with Body Balance During Cognitive Visual Exercises

When evaluation cognition, there is a certain complexity surrounding electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings, which would greatly benefit from being supplemented by secondary recordings, such as those from a force platform. Currently, there is also a lack of evidence supporting the need to implement creative exercise on analytical coursework, specifically in STEM degrees where there is gaining momentum to incorporate the arts [3]. This pilot study aims to correlate electroencephalography (EEG, Brain Vision) and postural sway (AMTI AccuSway) data to verify cognitive changes. This study hypothesizes that participants will have 1) increased EEG alpha activity and 2) increased postural sway when participating in iterations of a problem-solving tasks administered after the participant engages in creative activities. The study will use human-subject data gathered from electroencephalography (Brain Vision) and postural sway (AMTI AccuSway) to quantify the cognitive engagement of participants during the learning of new concepts in a unique manner that allows the participants to think about them visually. The hypothesis is that the teaching methods introduced will encourage participants to have increased cognitive attention. Two participants were evaluated on their postural sway and EEG activity during the answering of Raven’s Progressive Matrices tests before and after artistic viewing and drawing activities. The data generated by this study by these means will show that increased cognition is apparent when concepts are presented in a visual manner, fortifying a philosophy that engineering curricula would benefit from artistic additions.
Listed In: Neuroscience, Posturography