The Force and Motion Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose purpose is to support students in fields related to multi-axis force measurement and testing. Fully funded by AMTI, The Foundation awards travel grants to aid promising graduate students on their paths to becoming the scientific leaders of tomorrow. The Foundation also serves as creator and curator of the Virtual Poster Session, an international resource for information exchange and networking within the academic community.

 

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Since its inception, The Foundation has granted $190,000.00 in academic scholarships and $34,000.00 in travel awards

 

 

 

HAPPENING NOW...

Please join us in congratulating the 2019 1st qtr Travel Award recipients.  Note we chose nine this quarter.

Stephanie Cone - North Carolina State Univ, Steven Garcia - Univ Michigan, Lauren Elizabeth Schroeder - Univ. Tennessee, Tanner Thorsen - Univ. Tennessee, Shelby Peel - Univ. Tennessee, Seunguk Han - Brigham Young University, Adam Dyer - Trinity College Dublin, R. Priyadharshini - Central Leather Research Institute, Jamie Benson - Univ Delaware

Submit your Scientific Poster for 2019 2nd Quarter $1000 Academic Travel Scholarships now.

Recent Posters

Stair falls are a major problem for older people. The present study: a) applied a novel multivariate approach to characterize the overall stair behaviour while ascending and descending stairs and b) investigated whether the selected stepping behaviour was maintained irrespective of step dimensions. K-means clustering was used to characterize the overall behaviour of 70 older (>65 y) and 25 younger adults based on biomechanically risky and conservative strategies. Age and fall history were not unique factors of the clusters, highlighting the limitations of conventional comparisons. Moreover, changing the staircase to ‘easier’ step dimensions tended to have no effect on the selected stepping behaviour. Further research should implement this multivariate method using a longitudinal approach to identify the behaviours that can differentiate those who will experience a stair fall from those who will not.


Listed In: Biomechanics, Gait

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) stabilizes the lower limb against translational and rotational loads while the knee is is multiple postures. Surgical reconstruction, the most common treatment for ACL tears, is intended to replicate the biomechanical function of the native ACL in the postures and activities related to daily living and high-impact activities. In order to improve outcomes from ACL reconstructions in patients in pediatric and adolescent age groups, we need to improve our understanding of the knee posture dependent biomechanical function of the ACL. As such, the objective of this study was to quantify flexion angle dependent changes in the response of the ACL and the total knee to applied loads in the anterior-posterior and varus-valgus directions using a skeletally immature porcine model. To do this, we collected stifle (knee) joints from female Yorkshire-cross pigs at ages ranging from 1.5 to 18 months (n=30 total). The joints were tested using a 6 degree-of-freedom universal force sensing robotic system under applied anterior-posterior loads and varus-valgus moments at 40° and 60° of flexion. Studied parameters included anterior-posterior tibial translation (APTT), varus-valgus rotation (VVR), and anterior force carried by the ACL and its anteromedial and posterolateral bundles. We found increased knee laxity (APTT and VVR) was associated with both younger age and increased knee flexion. Greater anterior force carried in the ACL, and specifically in the anteromedial bundle, was associated with increased flexion, regardless of age. These findings have implications in intraoperative graft assessment and biomechanical models.


Obesity and female sex are considered independent risk factors for the development of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) which may be due to aberrant gait biomechanics. Few data exist on the interaction of obesity and female sex despite their independent influence on KOA risk. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of sex and BMI on knee joint sagittal and frontal plane gait mechanics. Dependent variables included the knee flexion moment (KFM) and first peak knee adduction moment (KAM1). Gait biomechanics were assessed in 42 obese and 39 normal weight participants that were matched on age and sex. Kinematic and kinetic data were sampled using a 9-camera Qualisys system and 2 AMTI force-plates. Participants completed walking trials in laboratory standard neutral-cushion footwear at self-selected speed and the external KFM and KAM1 during the first 50% of stance was extracted and normalized to a product of bodyweight (N) and height (m). A 2 (BMI) by 2 (Sex) analysis of co-variance (α=0.05) was used to examine dependent variables with gait speed as a covariate. The BMI by sex interaction was not significant for KFM (p=0.073) or KAM1 (p=0.703). A main effect was observed for sex and females exhibited smaller KFM (p=0.05) and greater KAM1 (p=0.004) compared to males. No differences were found in normalized knee moments between BMI groups. Regardless of BMI, females exhibited aberrant gait mechanics that are indicative of KOA progression. Further studies are needed examining the influence of altered gait in young, healthy females on knee cartilage morphology.


Listed In: Biomechanics, Gait

The Force and Motion Foundation Updates...

 

 

The Force and Motion Foundation 

 

Submit your 2019  2nd Quarter Scientific Poster NOW for the F&M $1000 Travel Scholarship! 

 

*F & M Foundation allows for one submission per year, per individual, with a total maximum award to be granted per individual of $2000 over their lifetime, (2 submissions)

 

Please check back in the future for information on more scholarship offers