The Force and Motion Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose purpose is to support students in fields related to multi-axis force measurement and testing. Fully funded by AMTI, The Foundation awards travel grants to aid promising graduate students on their paths to becoming the scientific leaders of tomorrow. The Foundation also serves as creator and curator of the Virtual Poster Session, an international resource for information exchange and networking within the academic community.

 

Just click the orange tabs to learn more about all the foundation has to offer...

 

Since its inception, The Foundation has granted $220,000.00 in academic scholarships and $119,000.00 in travel awards

 

 

 

HAPPENING NOW...

Please join us in congratulating our 4th quarter  Academic Travel awardees: Arnab Bhattacharjee - University of Delaware, Manuel Cardona - Universidad Don Bosco, Honduras

Submit your Scientific Poster for 2020 1st Quarter $1000 Academic Travel Scholarships now
.

Recent Posters

No reliable calibration method has yet been developed for scanning probe friction measurements. As a result, the tribology basic science literature sits on a foundation of uncalibrated measurements that may or may not be comparable across studies. This paper aims to resolve this critical problem. Essentially, we adapt a mature and widely accepted technology, the pre-calibrated reference lever, as a means to store forces from a traceable calibration standard of fixed range (e.g. microbalance) and scale them to accommodate the load ranges (normal and lateral) of an arbitrary scanning probe. This paper presents the theory, demonstrates a simple prototype device and method of use, and validates the approach along several independent lines of analysis. As the results demonstrate, the generalized reference lever method is simple, reliable, and traceable. The concept, approach, and validation will be especially easy to grasp and implement by those who are practiced with the reference lever method of normal force calibration.


In this work, a 3D lower limb musculoskeletal model and simulation of multiple sclerosis disease is presented. The Model was developed using the Musculoskeletal Modeling Software (MSMS), MSMS has the advantage that the model can be exported directly to Simulink allowing us to generate Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) and evaluate different injuries. From the simulations, is possible to obtain the joint range of motion, joint torque, muscle-tendon length, force and moment arm, this is important not only to perform biomechanical analysis but also to design exoskeleton robots for rehabilitation and to generate reference trajectories for control purposes. In order to validate the results, a study case of a normal and pathological gait is presented, then, the results are compared with the literature and with real data obtained from a low cost, and a professional gait capture system.


The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of induced stress on the performance of each task during high cognitive load situations(HCLS). We hypothesized that induced stress leads to performance decrements during HCLS.
In this study, the HCLS included standing while completing a secondary task(wire maze). The wire maze was composed of a metal wire path(maze) and a single ring, held in one hand that was moved over the maze without contacting the maze itself. Stress was induced through a loud buzzer when the ring contacted the maze. Participants were asked to randomly stand 1)quietly, or while completing the wire maze 2)with or 3)without the buzzer. Trials were three-minute long.
A sample of 18 healthy young participants, (24.76±3.56 years) were randomly recruited.
Perceived stress was obtained after each trial. Regularity of ground-reaction-force (GRF) in anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions as well as wire maze error (ring-to-path contact) were calculated as primary and secondary task performance.
GRF was more irregular during quietly standing compared to HCLS with and without the buzzer in both the AP and ML directions(p=0.02, p=0.001, respectively in anterior-posterior,η^2=0.28)&(p=0.004, p<0.0001, respectively in medial-lateral, η^2=0.39). Perceived stress was significantly lower during quietly standing compared to HCLS with(p=0.001, η^2=0.45) and without buzzer(p=0.007) conditions. Overall, the hypothesis was supported partially; during the most stressful HCLS, the high level of perceived stress coincided with less wire maze errors(P<0.0001, d= 0.72).
Identifying the strategies underlying task prioritization can help clinicians design appropriate interventions to challenge patients appropriately to improve performance during HCLS.


The Force and Motion Foundation Updates...

 

 

The Force and Motion Foundation 

 

Submit your 2020  1st Quarter Scientific Poster NOW for the F&M $1000 Travel Scholarship! 

 

*F & M Foundation allows for one submission per year, per individual, with a total maximum award to be granted per individual of $2000 over their lifetime, (2 submissions)

 

Please check back in the future for information on more scholarship offers