The Force and Motion Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose purpose is to support students in fields related to multi-axis force measurement and testing. Fully funded by AMTI, The Foundation awards travel grants to aid promising graduate students on their paths to becoming the scientific leaders of tomorrow. The Foundation also serves as creator and curator of the Virtual Poster Session, an international resource for information exchange and networking within the academic community.

 

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Since its inception, The Foundation has granted $190,000.00 in academic scholarships and $34,000.00 in travel awards

 

 

 

HAPPENING NOW...

The Force and Motion Foundation now offers up to seven $1000 Academic Travel Scholarships per quarter. 

Submit your Scientific Poster for 2019 1st Quarter $1000 Academic Travel Scholarships now.
 

Recent Posters

THA is a reliable method to improve the quality of life in osteoarthritis patients. However, it is still unclear whether it would lead to improved functional mobility. The purpose was to develop a biomechanical functional score to quantify the joint mechanics of THA patients compared to healthy participants (CTRL).
Twenty-four THA patients and 12 CTRL (age-, sex-, and BMI-matched) participants were recruited and underwent motion analysis for different ADLs tasks prior and nine months after THA. Three-dimensional joint kinematics and ground reaction forces were collected and five kinematic and six kinetic variables were included in the analysis. The normalized root-mean-square-deviation (nRMSD) was calculated between the THA and the CTRL groups for both pre- and post-op conditions: nRMSD= √((∑_(t=1)^n(x_(1,t)- y_(1,t))^2)/n)⁄(x_max-x_min). Kinematics and kinetics improvement scores (KMIS and KNIS) were calculated to estimate pre/post-op differences: KMIS=∑_(i=1)^n〖〖(KM〗_(pre/ctrl i)-〖KM〗_(post/ctrl i))〗; KNIS=∑_(i=1)^n〖〖(KN〗_(pre/ctrl i)- 〖KN〗_(post/ctrl i))〗.
THA patients experienced post-op improvements, with kinetics variables closely resembling the CTRLs, especially on hip and knee power production. Total improvement scores showed that THA experienced greater improvements during a squat task and this can be a practical approach to evaluate the change in biomechanical function and highlight small improvements that may go unnoticed with traditional statistical analysis.


Background: Several risk factors have been identified as contributors to the development of shoulder injuries, including glenohumeral internal rotation deficit, rotator cuff weakness, and shoulder instability. However, lasting deficits of the physical characteristics among overhead athletes with a history of a shoulder injury are unknown. Objective: To compare shoulder range of motion (ROM), strength, and upper-quarter dynamic balance between collegiate overhead athletes with and without a history of a shoulder injury. Methods: 58 overhead athletes were distributed into a shoulder injury history group (n=25) and healthy group (n=33). All participants were fully participating in NCAA Division I baseball, softball, volleyball, or tennis and free of any symptoms of shoulder injuries. An investigator measured active ROM for dominant shoulder internal rotation (IR), external rotation (ER), and horizontal adduction (HAD) using a digital inclinometer. Isometric strength for dominant shoulder IR and ER at 90° of abduction was measured using a hand-held dynamometer. The upper quarter dynamic balance was assessed via the Upper Quarter Y-Balance Test (UQYBT). Results: The injury group demonstrated a lower UQYBT mean score in the superolateral direction. However, there were no statistically significant intergroup differences in shoulder ROM, strength, ER/IR strength ratio, and UQYBT in the medial direction and inferolateral direction. Conclusions: Overhead athletes with a previous history of shoulder injury had poorer UQYBT in the superolateral direction despite a lack of ongoing symptoms or deficits in function. Well-planed dynamic balance training and related strengthening exercises may be warranted for overhead athletes to improve their upper quarter functions.


The tackle height law in rugby union has been an area of concern for many years. It is currently set at the line of the ball carrier’s shoulder. The goal of this study is to use Model-Based Image-Matching (MBIM) and human volunteer tackles in a marker-based 3D motion analysis laboratory to examine the severity of a legal tackle to the shoulder/chest of the ball carrier (with no head contact) and the effect of tackles above and below the chest on ball carrier inertial head kinematics, respectively.
From the real-world tackles, the estimated ball carrier peak resultant change in head angular velocity was 30.4 rad/s (23.1 rad/s, 14.0 rad/s and 21.8 rad/s in the coronal, sagittal and transverse direction, respectively). In the staged tackles, the median peak resultant head linear and angular acceleration and change in head angular velocity values for tackles above the chest were greater than for below the chest. The results support the proposition of lowering the current tackle height law. Due to the real-world tackle (MBIM), the ball carrier head kinematics indicated a greater than 75% chance of sustaining a concussion, based on the literature. This was the case even though no contact was made with the ball carrier’s head. Therefore, repeatedly engaging in this type of legal tackle may be detrimental for long-term brain health. However, by lowering the tackle height law to below the chest, ball carrier inertial head kinematics can be reduced significantly, thus reducing the repetitive loading placed on the brain.


The Force and Motion Foundation Updates...

 

 

The Force and Motion Foundation 

 

Submit your 2019 st Quarter Scientific Poster NOW for the F&M $1000 Travel Scholarship! 

 

*F & M Foundation allows for one submission per year, per individual, with a total maximum award to be granted per individual of $2000 over their lifetime, (2 submissions)

 

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