Virtual Poster Session

Welcome to the Virtual Poster Session, a new and powerful tool for networking and information exchange. Here you can share your work, search though the poster library, and start a dialogue with others in your field. Each uploaded poster that pertains to force measurement and testing can currently be used to apply for an academic travel scholarship; please see the Scholarships page for application details and deadlines.

Rhythmical Bimanual Force Production: 1:2 and 2:3 Coordination Patterns

Conference: Neuroscience 2012
Abstract:

A large number of experiments have isolated a coalition of constraints, including cortical and subcortical neural crosstalk, that influence the coordination of the two hands functioning together. Recent findings, however, have demonstrated that these constraints are minimized when integrated feedback (Lissajous feedback) is used. Two experiments were designed to determine participants’ ability to coordinate 1:2 and 2:3 rhythmical bimanual force production tasks. We hypothesized that neural crosstalk should be more easily detected and characterized in tasks where the forces required to produce the goal pattern of coordination are increased. The task was to rhythmically produce and coordinate a pattern of isometric forces. A Lissajous display illustrated the specific pattern of force requirements needed to produce the goal pattern. The results indicated very effective temporal performance of the bimanual coordination patterns. This result is similar to that observed in our earlier work with reciprocal and circling motion, but is especially informative given that the increased forces required to produce the desired bimanual coordination pattern resulted in a consistent and identifiable distortion of the left limb forces that could be attributable to the production of right hand forces. We were not able to detect distortions of the forces produced by the right limb that could be attributable to the left limb. This type of right to left limb influence, which may be attributable to asymmetrical cortical and subcortical crosstalk, was not evident in our earlier work when the bimanual coordination tasks involved movements of the limbs in a relatively frictionless environment.


Listed In: Neuroscience,
Tagged In: bimanual force, neural crosstalk

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