Virtual Poster Session

Welcome to the Virtual Poster Session, a new and powerful tool for networking and information exchange. Here you can share your work, search though the poster library, and start a dialogue with others in your field. Each uploaded poster that pertains to force measurement and testing can currently be used to apply for an academic travel scholarship; please see the Scholarships page for application details and deadlines.

Sort By: Most Recent | Most Popular View All
Name: troyrand

Healthy standing posture is characterized by the ability to interact with a changing environment while maintaining upright stance. Being adaptable to changing environments affords flexibility and allows the system to encounter novel environments without losing control of posture. The purpose of this research was to determine if stroke survivors could adapt to support surface translations with differing temporal structures.

Methods: Eight stroke survivors participated in this research. Participants stood on a force platform on the Neurocom Balance Manager (Neurocom Intl., Clackamas, OR, USA). The support surface was translated in the anteroposterior direction according to waveforms with different temporal structures, this included white noise, pink noise, brown noise, and a sine wave. They also performed a normal standing trial where the platform did not move. Root mean square and detrended fluctuation analysis of the center of pressure signal were calculated to determine amount and temporal structure of variability respectively.

Results: During normal standing the stroke survivors’ posture exhibited lack of adaptability. The stroke survivors had increased amount of variability in all conditions compared to normal standing, regardless of the inherent structure of the support surface translations. The temporal structure of variability indicated weakened long-range correlations in all conditions compared to normal standing. This indicates that regardless of the temporal structure of the support surface movement the amount of movement increased while the structure of movement became more random.

Previous work has demonstrated that healthy posture is able to adapt to the temporal structure of support surface translations, this adaptability was not seen in a population of stroke survivors. This lack of adaptability makes interactions with environmental perturbations difficult and impacts functionality. Focusing rehabilitation protocols towards regaining healthy temporal structures in postural control could improve functionality in chronic stroke survivors.


Name: sson2

Background: Knee joint pain (KJP) independently alters motor function and gait mechanics, and these alterations may accelerate chronic knee joint disease. While TENS restores motor function deficits, it is unclear whether TENS restores compensatory gait mechanics. The purpose was to examine the effects of KJP on lower-extremity joint moments, and the effects of TENS on the aforementioned variables. We hypothesized that KJP will result in altered gait patterns, and TENS will help restore these mechanical alterations.
Methods: We randomly selected 15 subjects for the TENS group, after which subjects were matched for the placebo group. Subjects underwent 3 sessions (hypertonic, isotonic, control). A 20-gauge flexible catheter was inserted into the right infrapatellar fat pad, and an infusion pump infused a saline of 0.154 mL•min¯¹ for 50 min (total = 7.7 mL). A TENS protocol was set at a biphasic mode with 120 µs and 180 Hz for 20 min. To blind placebo treatment, subjects in the placebo group was told that an electrical stimulation had been set to sub-sensory level. High-speed video (240 Hz) and an instrumented treadmill (1200 Hz) were used for gait analysis. Functional analysis of variance were used to evaluate differences between groups over time for joint moments. The mean curve with 95% CIs is represented by polynomial functions, showing us the entire stance, rather than identifying discrete peak points. If 95% CIs did not cross zero, significant difference existed (P < 0.05).
Discussion: KJP independently increase internal knee varus moments, which were consistent with previous finding using patients with osteoarthritic knee pain. These compensatory gait patterns may be a result of a pain-avoidance motor deficits strategies. Since observed patterns can create altered mechanical and biological stress patterns on articular surface, it may increase the risk of degenerative knee disease. However, attempting to reduce perceived pain and increase neuron activation through TENS can help overcome deficits in knee and hip joint moments.


Name: ktsong

One in three individuals who suffer a lateral ankle sprain (LAS) subsequently develop chronic ankle instability. However, our inability to properly treat acute LAS is not surprising given our limited understanding of post-LAS consequences. 12 patients (21.6±2.9yrs; 172.9±13.1cm; 79.1±21.4kg) with an acute LAS participated. All participants were evaluated for dorsiflexion range of motion (DFROM), time-to-boundary (TTB) in single limb balance (SLB), and self-reported function (SRF) at 1-week, 2-weeks, 4-weeks, 6-weeks, and 8-weeks post injury. Both the involved and uninvolved limbs were measured during the patients first test session. DFROM was assessed using the weight-bearing lunge test and all participants performed 3, 10s of single limb stance with eyes open on a force plate to measure their single limb balance. SRF was measured using the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) and FAAM-Sport (FAAM-S). Post injury time points were compared to a control condition using multivariate ANOVAs (α=0.05). Relative to the control condition, FAAM and FAAM-S were significantly lower at 1-week and 2-weeks post injury. The FAAM-S was also significantly lower score compare to control condition at 4-weeks post-injury. Both FAAM and FAAM-S were not significant different at 6-weeks post-injury. Post-injury TTB measures and DFROM were not significantly different from the control condition. Non-significant declines in DFROM and TTB were observed as in this sample of acute LAS and appear to present with unique recovery patterns. Different recovery patterns among the tested outcomes indicate the need for further research with a larger cohort and for a longer post-injury duration.


Name: alexandros.chri...

Victims of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) that have presented spinal injury in recent conflicts have been shown to have a high incidence of lumbar spine fractures. Previous studies have shown that the initial positioning of spinal bone-disc-bone complexes affects their biomechanical response when loaded quasi-statically; such a correlation, however, has not been explored at appropriate high loading rate scenarios that simulate injury. This study aims to investigate the response of lumbar spine cadaveric segments in different postures under axial impact conditions. Three T11-L1 bi-segments were dissected and tested destructively in a drop tower under flexed/neutral/extended postures. Strains were measured on the vertebral body and the spinous process of T12. Forces were measured cranially using a 6-axis load cell, and a high-speed camera was used to capture displacements and fracture. The impacted specimens were CT-scanned to identify the fracture pattern. Whilst axial force to failure was similar for flexed and extended postures, the non-axial forces and the bending moments, however, were dissimilar between postures. Although all specimens showed a burst fracture pattern, the extended posture failed more posteriorly. This suggests that axial force alone is not adequate to predict injury severity in the lumbar spine. This insight would not have been possible without the use of the 6-axis load cell. As metrics for spinal injury in surrogates take into account only the axial force, this programme of work may provide data for a better injury criterion and allow for a mechanistic understanding of the effects of posture on injury risk.


Name: rakshatha

Multisensory integration is driven by a process of sensory reweighting during which each input is assigned a weight depending on the current functional state of a particular sensory system, the task itself and the context in which it is being performed. The primary aim of this study was to determine which of the two inputs between ankle proprioception and vision is upweighed during a postural control task when the two inputs provide conflicting information pertaining to direction of body sway. Achilles tendon vibration and visual flow were used to create sensory conflict, which produced center of pressure (COP) sway in opposite directions when applied independently. The baseline conditions (1) consisted of eyes open quiet stance condition, eyes closed with vibration applied on the Achilles tendons (2) and eyes open with visual flow (3). The experimental condition simultaneously combined vibration and visual flow. COP excursions were recorded in 10 healthy young adults to evaluate the magnitude and direction of sway produced by vibration and/or visual flow. Additionally, lower body joint kinematics were evaluated to understand the multi-segmental strategies and their adaptation to the various sensory manipulations. The results showed that visual flow moderated the extent of backward COP and ankle angular displacement produced when vibration was applied independently. Additionally, visual flow was also found to reduce the extent of predominant hip strategy generated by ankle vibration. The findings show that visual input plays a significant role in maintaining stability and that ankle proprioception is downweighed during conflicts between vision and proprioception. This has important implication for balance training using controlled visual flow in patients with balance disorders and elderly.


Name: TDick

Introduction and Objectives: Traditional motion analysis provides limited insight into muscle and tendon forces during movement. This study used B-mode ultrasound, in combination with measured joint angles and scaled musculoskeletal models, to provide subject-specific estimates of in vivo Achilles tendon (AT) force. Previous studies have used ultrasound images, tracked in 3D space, to estimate AT strains during walking, running, and jumping [1,2]. Our approach extends this work in one novel way. Specifically, we characterized AT stiffness on a subject-specific basis by recording subjects’ ankle moments and AT strains during a series of isometric tests. We then used these data to estimate AT force during movement from in vivo measurements of tendon strain.
To demonstrate this approach, we report AT forces measured during cycling. Cycling offers a unique paradigm for studying AT mechanics. First, because the crank trajectory is constrained, joint angles and muscle-tendon unit (MTU) lengths of the gastrocnemius (MG, LG) and soleus (SOL) are also constrained. By varying crank load, subjects’ ankle moments can be altered without imposing changes in MTU lengths. For this study, 10 competitive cyclists were tested at 4 different crank loads while pedaling at 80 rpm. Based on published EMG recordings (e.g., [3]) and on in vivo tendon force buckle data from one subject [4], we hypothesized that the cyclists’ AT forces would increase systematically with crank load.

Methods: We coupled B-mode ultrasound with motion capture, EMG, and pedal forces to estimate in vivo AT forces non-invasively during cycling and during a series of isometric ankle plantarflexion tests. Marker trajectories were tracked using an optical motion capture system. Joint angles and MTU lengths were calculated based on scaled musculoskeletal models [5] using OpenSim [6]. A 50 mm linear-array B-mode ultrasound probe was secured over the distal muscle-tendon junction (MTJ) of the MG and was tracked using rigid-body clusters of LEDs. AT lengths were calculated as the distance from a calcaneus marker to the 3D coordinates of the MG MTJ. Subject-specific AT force-strain curves were obtained from isometric tests using ultrasound to track the MTJ, markers to track both the ultrasound probe and the AT insertion, and a strain gauge to measure the net ankle torques generated by each of the subjects at ankle angles of -10° dorsiflexion, 0°, +10° plantarflexion, and +20° plantarflexion. AT strain during cycling was converted to AT force using each subject’s force-strain relation. Subject-specific tendon slack lengths were calculated as the mean tendon length at 310° over all pedal cycles, based on examination of the AT length changes and on published data showing that this position in the pedal cycle precedes tendon loading across multiple pedalling conditions [4].

Results: Peak AT forces during cycling ranged from 1320 to 2160 N ± 400 N (mean± SD) and increased systematically with load (p<0.001; Fig. 1A/B). At the highest load, the peak AT forces represented, on average, 50 to 70 % of the combined MG, LG, and SOL muscles’ maximum isometric force-generating capacity, as estimated from the muscles’ scaled volumes [7], the muscles’ scaled optimal fiber lengths [5], and a specific tension of 20-30 N/cm2. Peak AT forces occurred midway through the pedaling downstroke, at about 80°, which is consistent with the AT forces directly measured from one subject [4] and with patterns of EMG during cycling [3]. Peak AT strains during cycling were uncoupled from the MG MTU strains and ranged from 3 to 5 % across the different loads examined, measured at the MG MTJ.

Conclusion: Our results are consistent with published data from a single subject in which AT force was measured using an implanted tendon buckle [8]; however, our results were obtained non-invasively using ultrasound and motion capture. These methods substantially augment the experimental tools available to study muscle-tendon dynamics during movement.

References:
[1]Lichtwark and Wilson, 2005, J Exp Biol, 208(24), 4715-4725.
[2]Lichtwark et al., 2007, J Biomech, 40(1), 157-164.
[3]Wakeling and Horn, 2009, J Neurophysiol, 101(2), 843-854.
[4]Gregor et al., 1987, Int J Sports Med, 8(S1), S9-S14.
[5]Arnold et al., 2010, Ann Biomed Eng, 38(2), 269-279.
[6]Delp et al., 2007, IEEE Trans Bio Med Eng, 54(11), 1940-50.
[7]Handsfield et al., 2014, J Biomech, 47(3),631-638.
[8]Gregor et al. 1991, J Biomech, 24(5), 287-297


Name: ADiffendaffer

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a vascular disease characterized by atherosclerotic blockages restricting blood flow to the lower extremities causing pain and discomfort with physical activity. Several studies have previously found decrements in ambulation associated with PAD, such as decreased joint moments and powers before and after the onset of claudication pain [1]. With decreases in moments and powers, the joint work may also be decremented as well. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the positive and negative work at the ankle, knee and hip of PAD patients in a pain-free condition and compare them to gait-velocity matched controls.

Five patients with PAD and five healthy older controls were consented for participation. Subjects walked along a 10-meter walkway at their own self-selected speed while kinematics and kinetics were recorded. Each subject rested one minute between trials to mitigate fatigue and prevent ischemic pain. The positive and negative joint work for the PAD patients’ affected limb and the right limb of each control were analyzed and compared through independent t-tests (α=0.05).

Five PAD patients (66.6 + 6.2 years; 178.2 + 9.3 cm; 102.6 + 18.5 kg; 1.16 + 0.07 m/s) and five controls (69 + 4.6 years; 174.5 + 1.6 cm; 79.4 + 8.14 kg; 1.30 + 0.09 m/s) were used for analysis.

From this study it was found that patients with PAD exhibit a 26% reduction in positive ankle joint work during stance phase than their healthy counterparts (p=0.012).


Listed In: Biomechanics
Name: cmoehlenbrock

Purpose: Research supports the use of ballroom dance to improve balance in individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD). This study used the Mark Morris Dance for PD program as a template for dance classes to examine the effects of dance on gait, balance, and quality of life in individuals with PD.
Subjects : Eleven individuals with mild to moderate PD participated in the study.
Methods : A trained instructor led dance classes for subjects once a week for 12 weeks. Participants were encouraged to use the Mark Morris Dance for PD At Home DVD twice a week for 45 minutes. Classes included a 20 min. seated warm up; a 20 min. supported standing portion focused on balance and strength; and 30 min. partnered movements for swing, shag, or tango. Data collected before and after the intervention included gait parameters (Protokinetics Zeno walkway), sway area (AMTI force platform) during mCTSIB, Mini-BESTest, Falls Efficacy Scale, Apathy Scale and PDQ-39. A paired-samples t-test was performed.
Results : Participants had significant decrease in apathy following the intervention (P = 0.018). A significant decrease in the percentage of the double support phase of gait indicated individuals spent less time with both feet in contact with the ground (P = 0.019).
Conclusions : An instructor-led dance class based on the Dance for PD program once per week for 12 weeks improved certain aspects of quality of life, but not necessarily gait and balance. Further research with increased frequency of supervised dance classes is indicated.


Name: sson2

Knee pain is 1 of 5 leading causes of disability by altering lower-extremity muscle function and gait mechanics. While transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) mitigates deficits of muscle function due to pain, it is unclear whether TENS improves gait mechanics. Each of 15 participant (24±3yrs, 71±12kg, 178±7cm) was assigned to the TENS or matched placebo group (23±2yrs, 72±14kg, 177±9cm). Participants underwent 3 different experimental saline infusion sessions (hypertonic, isotonic, control) in a counterbalanced order, separated by 48-h. Hypertonic (5% NaCl) or isotonic (0.9% NaCl) saline was infused into the infrapatellar fat pad for 50-min. No infusion was administered to the control session. Participants and investigators were blinded to the saline solution. A 20-min TENS or placebo treatment was administered, which was blinded to participants. Gait kinematic data were collected using the high-speed video (240 Hz) and force-sending tandem treadmill (1200 Hz) at each time interval (baseline, infusion, treatment, post-treatment). Functional ANOVA (α=0.05) were used to evaluate difference between 2 groups (TENS, placebo) over time. Pairwise comparison functions with 95% confidence interval were plotted to determine specific difference. Hypertonic saline infusion (pain) resulted in increased (1) ankle dorsiflexion (38-75% of stance), (2) knee valgus (20-40%), (3) knee flexion (40-90%), (4) hip adduction (72-100%), (5) hip flexion (50-90%). However, there was no group x time interaction for all kinematics. Altered gait strategies due to pain may play a role in long-term compensation that could have consequences for the joint. TENS treatment, however, did not acutely reduce the deficits in aforementioned kinematic variables.


Name: arielpelletier

Introduction: Running is a popular form of physical activity linked to various lower extremity injuries. A commonly used technique for injury prevention and rehabilitation is taping. There is considerable research investigating running biomechanics, however, there has been limited to no research examining the effects of gender, speed, and the type of tape used on two-dimensional lower extremity kinematics. Therefore, the purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of gender, speed, and tape on two-dimensional lower extremity kinematics and stride characteristics during running.

Method: Eight healthy runners participated (4 males, 4 females). Taping interventions (Leukotape, Kinesio Tape, no tape) and speeds (2.35 m/s, 3.35 m/s) were randomized and lower extremity stride kinematics were obtained using the Peak Motus System at initial contact, midstance, and toe off of running. Comparisons were made using descriptive statistics.

Results: Females exhibited greater hip (FIC= 164.04+1.99°; MIC= 167.54+2.12°) and knee flexion (FIC= 167.73+0.93°; MIC= 170.42+1.65°; FPK= 142.83+1.28°; MPK= 146.35+1.21°), while males had greater ankle dorsiflexion (FIC= 88.60+1.00°; MIC= 84.14+1.08°) and plantarflexion (FTO= 51.90+1.01°; MTO= 55.99+0.825°). Females spent more time in support (FCT= 0.28+0.03s; MCT= 0.26+0.02s) while males spent more time in the air (FFT= 0.45+0.02s; MFT= 0.48+0.01s). Faster speed was associated with greater hip flexion and extension (SIC= 167.57+1.95°; FIC= 164.01+2.11°; STO= 197.14+1.23°; FTO= 201.28+0.74°), peak knee flexion (SPK= 145.39+1.82°; FPK= 143.79+2.39°), and less time during contact (SIC = 0.30+0.01s; FIC= 0.25+0.00s).

Conclusion: Gender and speed seem to have effects on lower extremity stride kinematics, whereas type of tape does not.


Listed In: Biomechanics, Gait, Other