Virtual Poster Session

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Improved Prosthetic Gait Following Amputee-Specific Physical Therapy.

Conference: World Congress of Biomechanics
Abstract: Following amputation, an amputee must learn to walk again using a prosthesis. A goal of prosthetic rehabilitation is to reduce and eliminate asymmetries between the prosthetic leg and sound leg which may decrease the negative effects of long term force and work demands on the sound leg. An amputee-specific physical therapy program provides structured motor learning to aid in developing proper gait mechanics. However, physical therapy is not standard of care for all individuals receiving their first prosthesis due to limited evidence showing improved gait. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine whether amputees receiving physical therapy have better gait mechanics than those that do not. It was hypothesized that those who underwent an amputee-specific physical therapy program would display a more symmetrical gait pattern. Transtibial amputees walked overground at self-selected pace while kinetic (600Hz) and kinematic (60Hz) data were collected. The therapy group had previously received 2-3 therapy sessions per week for 3 months. Asymmetries were determined through dependent t-tests (α=0.05) comparing sound leg and prosthetic leg kinetic variables. Of the 23 kinetic variables tested, 17 variables showed significant difference between the sound leg and prosthetic leg for the group that did not receive the amputee-specific physical therapy. For the group that had previously received the therapy, only 4 variables showed differences between the sound and prosthetic leg. Thus, we showed that individuals partaking in amputee-specific physical therapy have a more symmetrical gait which results on less force and energy demands on the sound leg.
Listed In: Biomechanics, Gait, Physical Therapy,
Tagged In: Amputee gait, Physical Therapy

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