Virtual Poster Session

Welcome to the Virtual Poster Session, a new and powerful tool for networking and information exchange. Here you can share your work, search though the poster library, and start a dialogue with others in your field. Each uploaded poster that pertains to force measurement and testing can currently be used to apply for an academic travel scholarship; please see the Scholarships page for application details and deadlines.

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Name: mevan6

Asymmetries in discrete measures following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) during landing have been reported to be risk factors for secondary ACL injuries. Our purpose was to examine the impact of functional brace wear on kinematic and kinetic inter-limb movement symmetry during landing in ACL-R patients. 20 adolescent athletes (15.8 ± 1.2 years) (7 male, 13 female) 6 months following ACL reconstruction performed 5 trials of a stop-jump task in both a braced (B) and non-braced (NB) condition, with the first landing being analyzed. A custom fit functional knee brace (DJO, Vista, CA) was worn on the ACL reconstructed limb (AL) during the B trials. Mean curves were created for each limb (AL and unaffected limb (UL)) for the vertical (vGRF) and anterior-posterior ground reaction forces (apGRF) and frontal and sagittal knee angles and moments. Coefficients of multiple determination (CMD) between the AL and UL curves were compared between B and NB conditions with students’ t-tests (p≤0.05). No significant differences existed for movement and loading symmetry between B and NB conditions among all subjects. Secondary analysis revealed significant differences in apGRF (p=0.014), vGRF (p=0.011) and sagittal knee angles (p=0.003) in subjects with improved sagittal knee angle symmetry in the B condition. The data show that brace wear improves loading symmetry in adolescent patients that also exhibit improved sagittal knee angle symmetry while braced 6 months following ACL-R. Identifying factors that affect inter-limb movement and loading response to brace wear could assist in determining each patient’s need for a brace.


Name: stahl22

Purpose: To validate an instrumented figure skating blade that is designed to measure impact forces while skating. Methods: Seven subjects (Age: 21.3±2.8 yrs, Ht: 166.9±2.5 cm, Mass: 64.7±7.9 kg) performed 20 landings each onto artificial ice while landing on the instrumented blade from heights of 17.5cm, 25cm, and 33cm. A custom instrumented blade calibrated to measure in forces in Newtons (N) was used to measure impact forces (1000Hz) during landings. These forces were compared to forces obtained while subjects landed on AMTI force plates located underneath the artificial ice surface. Boot angle (250Hz) and force plate data (1000Hz) were collected using Vicon Nexus. Custom LabVIEW programs were used to determine peak force, loading rate, impulse, and the correlation between the blade force data and the force plate data. Paired T-tests were used to compare peak force, loading rate, and impulse between the blade and force plate data. Alpha = 0.05. Results: Correlations between the blade force data and force plate data were good to excellent: mean r (±SD) = .86 ± 0.08. No significant differences were found for peak force and impulse between the blade and force plate data. Peak force means (±SD) were 1353.7 ± 352.2 N for the blade and 1361.2 ± 309.7 N for the force plate (p=.86). Conclusion: The custom instrumented blade is a valid tool for measuring peak forces and impulse during landings. Current research is focused on increasing the gain of the instrumented blade to improve loading rate accuracy.


Listed In: Biomechanics
Name: claesamy

Nucleotomy is a surgical procedure following herniation and also simulates the reduced nucleus pulpousus (NP) pressure that occurs with disc degeneration. Internal disc strains are an important factor in disc function, yet it is unclear how internal strains are affected by nucleotomy. Grade II L3-L4 human cadaveric discs (n=6) were analyzed intact and after a partial nucleotomy that removed 30-50% of the NP through a left posterolateral incision (incision) while the contralateral side remained intact (uninjured). Two cycles of stress-relaxation testing were performed for reference (50N) and loaded (0.70MPa) configurations. After each 8hour equilibration period, the reference and loaded discs were imaged separately in a 7T MRI scanner (0.3mm isotropic resolution). The reference and loaded images were registered to calculate internal strain within the annulus fibrosus (AF) lamellae and discs were averaged to create anatomical templates. Circumferential, radial, and axial strains for each disc were transformed to the average templates, effectively normalizing the strains. Five circumferential regions were defined within the mid-third of the templates. Nucleotomy altered disc strains on both the incision and uninjured sides from the intact state. Strain fields were inhomogeneous through the five regions. Mean circumferential strain was unaffected by nucleotomy on the uninjured side, but decreased with incision, showing hoop strains through the AF were disrupted. Mean compressive axial strains were higher after nucleotomy, effectively reducing AF stiffness, and mean radial strains were unaltered after partial nucleotomy. These findings are important to address etiology and progression of degeneration, and to develop and evaluate therapeutic interventions.


Name: todd19

This study presents a new technique for acquiring ground reaction forces from novel, nanocomposite piezo-responsive foam (NCPF) sensors. A shoe was fitted with four NCPF sensors located at the heel, arch, ball, and toe positions. Running data was collected simultaneously from both the shoe sensors and from a force-sensing treadmill. A portion (30 randomly selected stance phases) of the treadmill data was used to develop a predictive stochastic model of GRF based on the sensor inputs. The stochastic model was then used to predict GRF for the remaining shoe sensor data, which was then benchmarked against the treadmill data. The results indicated that this model was able to predict forces in the x-axis (anterior-posterior) with 2.38% error, forces in the y-axis (medial-lateral) with 6.01% error, and forces in the z-axis (vertical) with 2.43% error. These novel sensors hold potential to dramatically improve both the ease and expense associated with GRF data, as well as allow unprecedented ability to measure GRF during real world applications outside of the laboratory.


Name: ulmans22

Multi-segmented foot and ankle (FandA) models provide more information regarding intrinsic foot motion compared to rigid-body models due to additional markers on bony landmarks of the foot. Marker placement sensitivity is a concern, especially in patients with bony abnormalities, because kinematics vary with marker placement deviations. PURPOSE: Assess kinematic changes due to marker placement error using the TSRHC multi-segmented FandA model. METHODS: Our participant was an 18yo female lacking any prior orthopedic conditions. The Plug-in-Gait model was used with the TSRHC model. An experienced clinician executed all marker placements, systematically moving each marker approximately 2.5mm within two planes. Three dynamic trials were collected for each condition, and static trials were used to calculate exact distances markers moved. Six force plates (AMTI) were utilized to confirm a consistent walking pattern. Graphs analyzed included: 1)PIG–ankle dorsiflexion, foot rotation, foot progression angle, 2)TSRHC–hindfoot, forefoot, FF-tibia. For each condition, the peaks of affected kinematic graphs were compared to assess correlations. Intra-trial error was determined by the maximum difference across walking trials. CONCLUSION: The hindfoot was most sensitive to transverse plane marker placement errors. Markers on metatarsals periodically rose vertically when moved laterally due to foot curvature causing errors in the sagittal plane as well. The forefoot also had transverse plane errors when metatarsal markers were moved. This case study illustrates the importance of proper marker placement training when utilizing a multi-segmented foot model. A thorough understanding of a utilized model is imperative, including how sensitive the model is to marker placement.


Name: asondall

The purpose of the study was to determine whether increasing trunk flexion (TF) and whole body inclination (WBI) angles influences peak knee, hip, and trunk kinematics and kinetics during running. Nineteen participants ran over ground at a self-selected speed under three postures: self-selected normal (SSN), TF, and WBI. Analyses revealed significant differences between conditions for peak knee, hip, and trunk flexion angles and peak knee and hip extension moments. Both TF and WBI postures are effective strategies for reducing peak knee extension moments during running with more load distributed to the hips. This may reduce PFJ stress and therefore aid in knee injury prevention and management. Individual preference of either altered running posture should be utilized in a clinical setting.


Listed In: Biomechanics
Name: clachanc

Compliant flooring is a promising intervention for reducing fall-related injuries among long-term care residents but may increase the forces required for direct care staff to perform pushing tasks. We analyzed initial and sustained hand forces required for care staff to push a wheelchair (n=14) or two floor-based lifts (traditional manual and motor-driven) (n=14), loaded with average and ninetieth percentile resident weights, over four flooring systems. Compliant subflooring increased push forces compared to concrete subflooring, especially with vinyl overlay, but pushing over a compliant subfloor with vinyl overlay did not require more force than pushing over a concrete subfloor with carpet overlay. Compared to the traditional lift, the motor-driven lift substantially reduced push forces on all flooring systems. With the motor-driven lift only, resident weight did not influence push forces. These results provide new knowledge about the effects of compliant flooring and motor-driven lifts on push forces in long term care.


Listed In: Other
Name: chigh

Previous research has shown the utility of vibrotactile feedback to improve postural sway characteristics in persons with vestibular deficits. Tactile feedback given through vibration has been used more as a modality of training but immediate effects on postural control among older adults have not been investigated.
PURPOSE: To compare the immediate effects of tactile vibration on postural sway in healthy older adults in challenging stance and sensory conditions. METHODS: 10 healthy older adults (76.4 ± 6.8years), performed five standing balance conditions on a AMTI forceplate for 30s each: feet together on firm surface eyes open (C1), eyes closed (C2); feet together on foam surface eyes open (C3), eyes closed (C4), and tandem stance on firm surface eyes open (C5). Participants did 2 trials of each condition both with and without vibrotactile feedback. The feedback was given using a waist belt with sensors that were activated when participants swayed in a particular direction as detected by an Xbox Kinect camera (Sensory Kinetics system; Engineering Acoustics, Casselberry, FL). Center of pressure sway area was compared within each condition using a paired samples t-test to estimate the effect of vibration. RESULTS: See Table 1. Since only 5 subjects could complete C4 data was not included in statistical analysis. CONCLUSION: Tactile vibration did not acutely effect postural sway in challenging stance conditions in healthy older adults. Long term effects of tactile vibration on postural sway in challenging stance conditions need to be investigated.


Listed In: Physical Therapy
Name: jastein

Mechanography during the vertical jump test allows for evaluation of force-time variables reflecting jump execution, which may enhance screening for functional deficits that reduce physical performance and determining mechanistic causes underlying performance changes. However, utility of jump mechanography for evaluation is limited by scant test-retest reliability data of force-time variables. Purpose: To examine test-retest reliability of jump execution variables assessed from mechanography using two different protocols. Methods: 32 women (mean ± SD: age = 20.8 ± 1.3 yr, height = 167.6 ± 6.3 cm, mass = 68.2 ± 12.7 kg) and 16 men (age = 22.1 ± 1.9 yr, height = 181.5 ± 5.0 cm, mass = 94.1 ± 24.6 kg) attended a familiarization session followed by two testing sessions, all one week apart, during which they performed the vertical jump test and had mechanography data recorded. Participants performed six squat jumps (SJ) per session, with squat depth self-selected for the first three jumps and controlled using a goniometer to 110º knee flexion for the remaining three jumps. Raw data were sampled at 1,000 Hz and filtered with a cutoff frequency of 90.9 Hz using Bertec Digital AcquireTM. Jump execution variables were calculated using a macro program in Microsoft Visual Basic. Eight force-time variables were assessed. Test-retest reliability was quantified as the systematic error (using %difference between jumps), random error (using coefficients of variation), and test-retest correlations (using intraclass correlation coefficients).Results: Jump execution variables demonstrated good reliability, evidenced by very small systematic errors (mean ±95%CI: –1.2 ±2.3%), small random errors (mean ±95%CI: 17.8 ±3.7%), and very strong test-retest correlations (range: 0.73-0.97). Differences in random errors between controlled and self-selected protocols were negligible (mean ±95%CI: 1.3 ±2.3%). Conclusion: Jump execution variables demonstrated good reliability, with no meaningful differences between the controlled and self-selected SJ depth protocols. To simplify testing, a self-selected SJ depth protocol can be used to assess force-time variables with negligible impact on measurement error


Listed In: Biomechanics
Name: rlkrup

Calculating and interpreting joint moments using marker position and ground reaction force (GRF) data is a fundamental part of gait biomechanics research. Due to noise in marker positions, these data are low-pass filtered prior to performing inverse dynamics. Traditionally, kinematic data are filtered at low cutoff frequencies (~6 Hz) and kinetic data are filtered at high frequencies (~30-100 Hz). This technique can result in joint moment impact peaks, particularly during high-impact movements. Filtering marker and GRF data at the same cutoff frequency has been suggested to attenuate these impact artefacts. The effect of various filtering approaches on joint moments in walking is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of low-pass filtering cutoff frequencies on joint moments during walking. We hypothesized that filtering would not affect peak joint moments during walking due to smaller violations of the rigid body assumption compared to high-impact movements. Kinetic and kinematic data were collected for twenty-four health adults walking at self-selected speed. Marker position and GRF were smoothed using a 4th-order dual-pass Butterworth filter with cutoff frequencies of 6/45 Hz, 6/6 Hz, 10/10 Hz, for markers and GRF, respectively. A one-way repeated measures ANOVA tested for the effect of filter frequency on peak hip and knee joint moments. Peak hip and knee moments were greater when filtered at 10/10 Hz compared to 6/45 Hz. Although there were differences between cutoff frequency conditions, the effect sizes were small, suggesting that the differences are not large enough to have a meaningful effect.


Listed In: Biomechanics