varus thrust

Quantifying varus and valgus thrust in individuals with severe knee osteoarthritis

Background: Gait abnormalities can influence surgical outcomes in people with severe knee osteoarthritis (OA) and thus a thorough understanding of gait abnormalities in these people prior to arthroplasty is important. Varus-valgus thrust is a characteristic linked to OA disease progression that has not yet been investigated in a cohort with severe knee OA awaiting knee arthroplasty. The aims of this study were to determine i) prevalence of varus and valgus thrust in a cohort with severe knee OA compared to an asymptomatic group, ii) whether the thrust magnitude differed between these groups iii) differences between varus and valgus thrusters within the OA cohort and iv) whether certain measures could predict thrust in the OA cohort. Methods: 40 patients with severe knee OA scheduled for primary TKR and 40 asymptomatic participants were recruited. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed on all participants, with the primary biomechanical measures of interest being: varus and valgus thrust, knee adduction angle, peak KAM, and KAM impulse. Additionally, static knee alignment and quadriceps strength were assessed in the subgroup with knee OA. Findings: No difference was found in the prevalence of varus and valgus thrust between the severe OA and control groups (Pearson chi-square = 3.735, p value = 0.151). The OA varus thrust group had a significantly higher peak KAM (p=0.000), KAM impulse (p=0.001), static alignment (p=0.021), and lower quadriceps strength (p=0.041) than the valgus thrust group. Peak KAM and quadriceps strength were found to explain 34.9% of the variation in maximum thrust, such that an increase in KAM and a decrease in quadriceps strength were associated with an increase in maximum (varus) thrust. Interpretation: Few differences between the severe OA and control groups were seen, however dichotomizing the groups into varus and valgus cohorts revealed a number of biomechanical differences. Patients with severe OA are often treated as a homogenous cohort; however, by classifying which individuals have a varus or valgus thrust, we have identified a subset of patients with poorer biomechanics who could potentially be at a higher risk of a worse outcome after surgery.
Listed In: Biomechanics, Gait, Orthopedic Research