injury

SINGLE LEG LANDING STRATEGY IS ALTERED IN MALE PROFESSIONAL RUGBY UNION PLAYERS WHO DEVELOP ACHILLES TENDINOPATHY COMPARED TO INJURY FREE CONTROLS

Analysis of lower limb biomechanics during jumping and landing tasks are often used to assess lower limb injury risk in research and applied practice within professional team sports. However, there are limited instances of these movements being incorporated into research focusing on Achilles tendinopathy development. PURPOSE: To investigate whether differences existed in lower limb motion and moments during jumping and landing between individuals who develop Achilles tendinopathy and those who remain injury free. METHODS: Male professional Rugby Union players without lower limb injury (n = 43) were compared to players who sustained Achilles tendinopathy (n = 8). Five single-leg drop vertical jumps per leg were performed at the start of their pre-season training. Motion of the lower limbs were recorded synchronously with ground reaction force. RESULTS: Players who sustained Achilles tendinopathy demonstrated significantly increased rear-foot inversion-eversion range of motion (p = 0.03), a reduction in dorsi-plantarflexion range of motion (p = 0.01) and knee flexion-extension range of motion (p = 0.03). Peak dorsiflexion velocity (p = 0.02) and peak knee flexion velocity were also reduced in those with Achilles tendinopathy (p = 0.03). No differences in hip joint kinematics were observed. Controls displayed slightly larger peak plantarflexion moments; however this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.15, g = 0.60). CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicated that players who subsequently developed Achilles tendinopathy displayed an altered single leg landing strategy when compared to players who did not sustain injury; with motion of the ankle joint and rear-foot most influenced.


Listed In: Biomechanics, Sports Science