cleats

Stud Type Affects Knee Biomechanics on Infilled Synthetic Turf during a 180° Cut, but not during a Single-Leg Land-Cut Task

Higher ACL injury frequencies have been reported on synthetic turfs compared to natural turfs. However, assessments of cleat stud type on lower extremity biomechanics worn on these surfaces are limited. The purpose of this study was to examine the knee biomechanics of a non-studded running shoe (RS), a football shoe with natural turf studs (NTS), and with synthetic turf studs (STS) during single-leg land-cut and 180°-cut tasks on synthetic turf. Fourteen recreational football players performed five trials of 180°-cut and land-cut tasks in the three shoe conditions on an infilled synthetic turf. Knee biomechanics were analyzed using a 2x3 (task x shoe) repeated measures ANOVA followed by post-hoc paired samples t-tests (p<0.05). For the 180° cut, 1st peak internal knee adduction moments were increased in RS and STS compared to NTS (Table) and in 1st peak knee extensor moments in RS compared NTS and STS. The peak negative knee extensor power was increased in RS compared to NTS and STS. The land-cut had significantly greater peak extensor moments, sagittal plane powers, and abduction angles, and significantly lower adduction moments compared to the 180°-cut. As expected, the land-cut movement involved increased power absorption, power generation, and extensor moment compared to the 180°-cut. However, shoe effects lie only in the 180°-cut. Decreased medial ground reaction force1, knee adduction and extensor moments in NTS suggest the knee may be in a safer environment using these studs during cutting maneuvers. Reduced knee adduction moments in NTS could have implications in non-contact ACL injury.
Listed In: Biomechanics, Gait, Sports Science