The Force and Motion Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose purpose is to support students in fields related to multi-axis force measurement and testing. Fully funded by AMTI, The Foundation awards travel grants and academic scholarships to aid promising graduate students on their paths to becoming the scientific leaders of tomorrow. The Foundation also serves as creator and curator of the Virtual Poster Session, an international resource for information exchange and networking within the academic community.

 

Just click the orange tabs to learn more about all the foundation has to offer...

 

Since its inception, The Foundation has granted $190,000.00 in academic scholarships and $34,000.00 in travel awards

 

 

 

HAPPENING NOW...

FORCE & MOTION FOUNDATION $10,000 SCHOLARSHIP

A new and exciting approach to the Academic Scholarship has arrived!

 

Submit your Scientific Poster for 2017 2nd Quarter $500 Academic Travel Scholarships now 

 

 

 

Recent Posters

Stair negotiation is one of the more difficult daily activities reported by total knee replacement (TKR) patients. Dissatisfied TKR patients have reported increased difficulty with stair negotiation, however it is unknown what the underlying mechanical issues are for this population. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to examine the knee joint biomechanics of dissatisfied TKR patients during stair descent. Nine dissatisfied TKR patients (34.6±14.3 months from surgery), 15 satisfied TKR patients (29.3±12.8 months from surgery), and 15 healthy participants performed stair descent trials on a five-step instrumented staircase at a preferred gait speed. The dissatisfied group showed lower knee extension and abduction moments in their replaced limb. The 2nd peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) and 1st and 2nd peak knee internal rotation moments showed lower moments for replaced limbs compared to non-replaced limbs. First peak VGRF was reduced for dissatisfied group compared to satisfied and healthy groups. The dissatisfied TKR group had significantly increased pain levels on their replaced limb compared to all other groups and limbs. The dissatisfied group had reduced gait speed compared to the satisfied and healthy groups. Increased pain levels lead to reduced descent speed and peak loading-response and pushoff sagittal plane knee joint moments in dissatisfied total knee replacement patients during stair descent. This creates an asymmetry in the extension loading response moment for the dissatisfied group, with the non-replaced limb showing increased joint moments whereas the satisfied and healthy groups do not have that imbalance.


Listed In: Biomechanics

Collegiate softball has become increasingly popular since the passage of Title IX. As with any sport, injuries are a common occurrence. Interestingly, the base runner is at the highest risk of injury, and rounding the base, specifically, has resulted in approximately 187 game-day injuries. Rounding the base involves planting the right foot on a raised surface and cutting to the left, a dynamic movement often associated with noncontact ACL injuries. Frontal plane loading and unbalanced quadriceps-to-hamstring co-contraction indices (Q:H CCI) have been associated with increasing the likelihood of noncontact ACL injuries occurring. Neuromuscular abnormalities pre- and post-contact have also been suggested to increase the risk of injury. To date, no study has analyzed the effect of rounding a base on noncontact ACL injury risk factors in softball players. Nine recreationally active females completed two base conditions. The first simulated rounding a base with no base on the force platform (NB), and the second simulated rounding a base with a base on the force platform (WB). Three-dimensional motion capture, one force platform, and electromyography were utilized. Results indicated the WB condition reduced the risk of noncontact ACL injury by decreasing frontal plane loading. Movement patterns at the ankle and abnormal foot strikes may provide a better explanation for why noncontact ACL injuries occur while rounding first base. Post-contact Q:H CCI was significantly greater than pre-contact, indicating significantly greater quadriceps activity post-contact. Neuromuscular training could potentially reduce the load applied to the ACL and decrease the risk of injury.


Purpose: An increased likelihood of developing obesity-related knee osteoarthritis may be associated with increased peak internal knee abduction moments. Increases in step width may act to reduce this moment. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of increased step width on knee biomechanics during stair ascent of healthy-weight and obese participants. Methods: Participants ascended stairs while walking at their preferred speed in two different step width conditions – preferred and wide. A 2 x 2 (group x condition) mixed model analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to analyze differences between groups and conditions (p<0.05). Results: Increased step width decreased the loading-response peak vertical ground reaction force (GRF), loading-response knee abduction moment, knee extension ROM, and knee abduction ROM in both groups. However, it also increased loading and push-off peak mediolateral GRF, and peak knee abduction angle in both groups. Obese participants experienced a disproportionate increase in loading and push-off peak mediolateral GRF, and peak knee abduction angle compared to healthy. Conclusion: Increased SW successfully decreased loading-response peak knee abduction moment. Implications of this finding are that increased SW may decrease likelihood of developing medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. This study shows that this gait modification affects obese and healthy-weight differently, and the influence of body mass on knee biomechanics.


Listed In: Biomechanics

The Force and Motion Foundation Updates...

 

 

The Force and Motion Foundation 

The Force and Motion Foundation is proud to announce that our current $10,000 scholarship will be awarded in cooperation with the Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS). 

 

Please visit  http://www.ors.org/force-motionors-young-scientist-scholarship/ for more information on the Force & Motion Foundation/ ORS Young Scientist Scholarship. 

 

 

2017 1st Quarter recipients of the travel awards are: Jocelyn Hafer, Patrick Carden, Matthew Titchenal, Matthias König, S. Jun Son, Shelby Peel, Derek Yocum, Lauren Schroeder, and Kevin Valenzuela

 

Submit your 2017 2nd Quarter Scientific Poster NOW for the F&M $500 Travel Scholarship! 

 

*F & M Foundation allows for one submission per year, per individual, with a total maximum award to be granted per individual of $2,500 over their lifetime, (5 submissions)

 

Please check back in the future for information on more scholarship offers